About


Take On Payments, a blog sponsored by the Retail Payments Risk Forum of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, is intended to foster dialogue on emerging risks in retail payment systems and enhance collaborative efforts to improve risk detection and mitigation. We encourage your active participation in Take on Payments and look forward to collaborating with you.

Take On Payments

September 23, 2019


Designing Disclosures to Be Read

Have you ever wondered if consumers actually look at disclosures for payment services? And if they do look at them, how much time do you think they spend reading them? If the average adult reads around 250 words per minute and a disclosure page contains 1,000 words—likely a low estimate—then a consumer would spend four minutes on the page before clicking accept or reject. I am confident that a more realistic estimate of time consumers spend on these pages falls far short of the time required to read the legally required consumer protection information. How many of us just click on the "I Accept" button without reading the disclosure? Maybe it's time to come up with a better way to disclose.

I believe that disclosures are one of the more dreaded elements in designing, launching, and managing financial services. If you haven't experienced the dread first hand, you can find evidence of it in the countless comment letters submitted by payments stakeholders and posted to the Federal Register when a proposed rule could affect disclosure terms. The work and expense of delivering disclosures at precisely the time required by law are completely wasted when consumers fail to read them.

The goal of disclosures is to educate consumers on a product's terms and conditions, to define their responsibilities, and to ultimately protect them from financial harm or surprises. With this information, consumers can make informed decisions. We should hope consumers comprehend and retain the critical information provided.

Opportunities exist to present important consumer protection information in ways that are far more easily digestible than a thousand-word disclosure in a four-point font. For instance, a gamification model could ask the consumer direct questions related to fees in pop-up windows with animated visual representations of the scenarios. You can brainstorm to come up with messages, jotting down quick ideas—for example, "You chose instant transfer, the fee is $1, Accept or Decline." Or, "Help us monitor your transactions daily, instant transfers will be $0, Accept or Decline." A large font and short words can quickly articulate the key points and big risks. Moreover, building the disclosure logic into the technology better protects the consumer.

Here's some good news—you now have the support of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) to test your innovative solutions in making disclosures likelier to achieve their aim. The CFPB's Office of Innovation recently issued new policies to encourage innovation. For example, the office instituted a trial disclosure program and has committed to granting or denying applications for these trials within 60 days of submission. Accepted applicants will have up to two years to test their disclosures. They will also have access to state and global regulators through the CFPB's affiliation with the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council, the Global Financial Innovation Network, and the newly formed American Consumer Financial Innovation Network.

Applicants and disclosures need not be company- or product-specific, although that is an option. Service providers, trade associations, consumer groups, or other third parties may also use the trial application program. Group applications could help spread trial disclosure development costs such that smaller entities would be able to afford to participate in the program. Such intention has been evidenced in the CFPB's Office of Innovation's first "No-Action Letter," issued to more than 1,600 HUD housing counseling agencies, stating that it will not take enforcement action with agencies that enter into "certain fee-for-service arrangements with lenders for pre-purchase housing counseling services."

Have you considered redesigning a payment product or service disclosure that consumers will be likelier to read? Apply to test it , and good luck!

September 23, 2019 in consumer protection, financial technology, fintech, payments innovation, regulations | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

September 3, 2019


Is Friction in Payments Always Bad?

Numerous posts in this blog have noted the conventional wisdom that the less friction there is for a consumer in making a payment, the likelier it is that the consumer will have a good experience. Merchants, especially ecommerce retailers, point to studies consistently showing that when customers are required, for stronger authentication, to enter more information than they're used to during a payment, the cart abandonment rate increases and merchants lose sales. I have learned from my own conversations with merchants that some have backed away from adding more risk management tools because they would rather take the financial loss from a fraudulent transaction than discourage an otherwise legitimate sale. This balancing act between reducing friction for the customer and reducing fraud risk to the merchant or payment card issuer is a constant challenge.

Many merchants have incorporated mobile devices' biometric authentication features into their mobile apps to keep the customer from having to provide additional authentication data. Some other vendors have recently developed risk mitigation and authentication tools that work completely in the background and give them more confidence that the individual conducting the transaction is legitimate. These tools range from behavioral analytics that rely on patterns of previous transactions—whether they're based on a specific customer or on a group of customers with a similar profile—to electronic device information, called device fingerprinting, that validates that the device being used is actually the customer's. The customer is unaware that these tools are being used, so experiences lower friction.

A new term being used for what is regarded as an improved payment experience is the invisible payment transaction. This happens when a payment is triggered automatically without any customer intervention at the time of the transaction. The best examples of invisible transactions are in the sectors of subscription or card-on-file services. Subscription services include any service where the customer has provided, for example, a payment card or deposit account for a transaction and authorized the merchant or service provider to make future payments using that account. Online retailers, rideshare services, and recurring payments for health clubs, parking garages, utility companies, and charitable organizations are all types of businesses that use subscription services. A relatively recent entrant in the invisible payment segment is the computer/camera monitored shopping experience at some retailers.

So do invisible payments mean we've achieved nirvana? While they certainly provide the lowest level of customer interaction, they also have some possible disadvantages. Consumer advocates are concerned about the impact such payments might have on an individual's budget management. What if they forget about a subscription payment, and when it's deducted from their account, it creates an overdraft or insufficient funds return? Will invisible payments result in increased spending by the consumer? And then there is the bother of updating a bunch of subscriptions if the consumer changes the funding account.

While research has shown that consumers see convenience as a positive factor, they also want to be confident that there is a security process that will make them less likely to be victims of fraud. Will we ever reach the place of total payments peace and happiness with the right balance of security and convenience? Please let us know what you think.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

September 3, 2019 in consumer protection, fintech, innovation, mobile banking | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

August 12, 2019


At the Intersection of FinTech and Financial Inclusion

Technological innovation is booming, and many financial institutions and financial service providers, including mobile phone providers, are increasingly adopting financial technology, or fintech, to offer easier and faster payments to consumers. In other words, the consumers who have traditional banking services such as checking and savings accounts naturally have access to solutions such as online or mobile bill pay, account and P2P money transfers, and customized saving options. But what about the people who don't have a bank account?

According to the Federal Reserve's Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2018, approximately 6 percent of adults do not have a bank account, and approximately 22 percent are either unbanked or underbanked (having a bank account but relying on alternative financial services). How does the payments industry make sure that, in the words of the World Bank, all "individuals and businesses have access to useful and affordable financial products and services that meet their needs"? How can the industry help boost financial inclusion, which is "a key enabler to reducing poverty and boosting prosperity" (also in the words of the World Bank)?

Chart-banking-status

Join us for the Atlanta Fed's latest episode in our Talk About Payments webinar series on Thursday, August 22, from 1 to 2 p.m. (ET). A panel of payments experts will focus on how fintech aims to improve financial inclusion by giving people who are un- or underbanked access to the payments system. Panel members will also discuss current research on financial inclusion and programs intended to support economic mobility.

Panel members are:

  • Dr. Sophia Anong, associate professor, financial planning, housing and consumer economics, University of Georgia
  • Nancy Donahue, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
  • Catherine Thaliath, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Participation is free, but you must register in advance. After you've registered, you'll receive a confirmation email with the login and toll-free call-in information. We hope you and your colleagues will join us and be part of the discussion as we delve into the ways financial technology is helping to meet the needs of the underserved.

Photo of Catherine Thaliath By Catherine Thaliath, project management expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

August 12, 2019 in financial technology, fintech, payments innovation | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

April 22, 2019


The Prepaid Rule: All Jokes Aside

A payments compliance rule took effect this year on April Fools' Day, and it occurred to me that when a compliance deadline is approaching, you might not feel like joking around. The Prepaid Accounts Final Rule was issued a few years ago, in 2016, but after a number of postponements, its effective date is finally behind us.

The rule standardizes disclosures, error resolution procedures, consumer liability limits, and access to records. These changes are intended to provide comprehensive consumer protections for prepaid accounts under the Electronic Fund Transfer Act, or Regulation E. The rule is fairly comprehensive, but for the sake of brevity, I'm going to look at only a couple areas of the rule—those that stand out to me.

Consumers can now expect protections over their transaction accounts regardless of whether the account is offered directly by a traditional financial institution or by a third party, such as a fintech or merchant, as they make electronic payments (debit, prepaid, ACH). Also, fintech companies that allow consumers to store funds or are thinking about adding that ability may want to prepare themselves to be designated as prepaid services providers and therefore subject to the regulatory and licensing requirements that go along with that designation. To that point, I am not surprised to see several big names recently listed on the FinCen Money Service Business Registration as "Providers of prepaid access." (To see the list, scroll down the web page to the MSB registration form; on the MSB ACTIVITIES field, click the down arrow to open the dropdown list; select Provider of prepaid access and click the Submit button.)

Established prepaid issuers have long been preparing for the new prepaid rule despite the stops and starts of an effective date and the uncertainty about some of its key provisions. Because consumers open prepaid accounts in a variety of ways—from starting a new job to purchasing prepaid cards at a retail checkout lane—it can be difficult to accommodate the disclosure requirements, such as those for listing fees, that the prepaid rule prescribes. Most issuers have changed product packaging to accommodate the new disclosures. These changes required complicated logistics coordination for the prepaid supply chain to replace old, noncompliant inventory with new, compliant card packages. Some issuers are still grappling with how to list types of fees that may not apply to their particular account program.

Many issuers had already been providing some level of consumer protection from unauthorized transactions before the rule requirement took effect. Now there will be a standard expectation. Limited liability and error resolution benefits need apply only to customers who have successfully completed the identification and verification process, if there is one for their particular program. Regulation E's error resolution and limited liability requirements do not extend to prepaid accounts (other than payroll or government benefit accounts) that have not completed the verification process, one of the key revisions after the rule's initial issue.

The rule will change the way we categorize prepaid services. For instance, in the past, discussion around prepaid products focused on whether the product was open- or closed-loop, and whether it was reloadable or nonreloadable. While those characteristics still exist, they are not necessarily a determinant as to whether the rule applies to a particular product or not. There are clear exclusions for certain products like those that are marketed and labeled as gift cards, health care savings cards, or disaster relief cards. However, even if a product doesn't have "prepaid" on its label, it may still fall under Regulation E. Coverage extends to asset accounts that consumers can use to conduct transactions with multiple, unaffiliated merchants for goods or services, to pull cash from automated teller machines, or to make person-to-person transfers.

For both incumbents and those finding themselves new in prepaid, it has been no joke to prepare to comply with the new rule. Despite the extra burden, do you think we will look back on this milestone favorably in the future? I think the new prepaid rule will lead to strengthening trust and confidence in these products. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) pledges to be vigilant in evaluating new rules. Moreover, the CFPB is required to submit a formal evaluation five years following a rule's effective date. The industry should be ready to help measure the rule's impact.

Photo of Jessica Washington By Jessica Washington, AAP, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

April 22, 2019 in fintech, prepaid, regulations | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

March 25, 2019


Safeguarding Privacy and Ethics in AI

In a recent post I referred to the privacy and ethical guidelines that the nonprofit advocacy group EPIC (Electronic Privacy Information Center) is promoting. According to this group, these guidelines are based on existing regulatory and legal guidelines in the United States and Europe regarding data protection, human rights doctrine, and general ethical principles. Given the continued attention to advancements in machine learning and other computing technology advancements falling under the marketing term of “artificial intelligence” (AI), I thought it would be beneficial for our readers if we were to review these guidelines so the reader can assess their validity and completeness. The heading and the italicized text in these guidelines are EPIC’s specific wording; additional text is my commentary. It is important to point out that neither the Federal Reserve System nor the Board of Governors has endorsed these guidelines.

  • Right to Transparency. All individuals have the right to know the basis of an AI decision that concerns them. This includes access to the factors, the logic, and techniques that produced the outcome. EPIC says the main elements of this principle can be found in the U.S. Privacy Act and a number of directives from the European Union. It is unlikely that the average person would be able to fully understand the complex computations generating a decision, but everyone still has the right to an explanation of and validation for the decision.
  • Right to Human Determination. All individuals have the right to a final determination made by a person. This ensures that a person, not a machine, is ultimately accountable for a final decision.
  • Identification Obligation. The institution responsible for an AI system must be made known to the public. There may be many different parties that contribute to an AI system, so it is important that anyone be able to determine which party has overall responsibility and accountability.
  • Fairness Obligation. Institutions must ensure that AI systems do not reflect unfair bias or make impermissible discriminatory decisions. I understand the intent of this principle—any program developed by a person will have some level of inherent bias—but how is it determined that the level of bias has reached an “unfair” level, and who makes such a determination?
  • Assessment and Accountability Obligation. An AI system should be deployed only after an adequate evaluation of its purpose and objectives, its benefits, as well as its risks. Institutions must be responsible for decisions made by an AI system. An AI system that presents significant risks, especially in the areas of public safety and cybersecurity, should be evaluated carefully before a deployment decision is made.
  • Accuracy, Reliability, and Validity Obligations. Institutions must ensure the accuracy, reliability, and validity of decisions. This basic principle will be monitored by the institution as well as independent organizations.
  • Data Quality Obligation. Institutions must establish data provenance, and assure quality and relevance for the data input into algorithms. As an extension of number 6, detailed documentation and secure retention of the data input help other parties replicate the decision-making process to validate the final decision.
  • Public Safety Obligation. Institutions must assess the public safety risks that arise from the deployment of AI systems that direct or control physical devices, and implement safety controls. As more Internet-of-Things applications are deployed, this principle will increase in importance.
  • Cybersecurity Obligation. Institutions must secure AI systems against cybersecurity threats. AI systems, especially those that could have a significant impact on public safety, are potential targets for criminals and terrorist groups and must be made secure.
  • Prohibition on Secret Profiling. No institution shall establish or maintain a secret profiling system. This principle ensures that the institution will not establish or maintain a separate, clandestine profiling system to assure the possibility of independent accountability.
  • Prohibition on Unitary Scoring. No national government shall establish or maintain a general-purpose score on its citizens or residents. The concern this principle addresses is that such a score could be used to establish predetermined outcomes across a number of activities. For example, in the private sector, a credit rating score can be a factor not only in credit decisions but also in other types of decisions, such as for vehicle, life, and medical insurance underwriting.
  • Termination Obligation. An institution that has established an AI system has an affirmative obligation to terminate the system if human control of the system is no longer possible. I refer to this final principal as the “HAL principle” from 2001: A Space Odyssey, where the crew tries to shut down HAL (a Heuristically programmed ALgorithmic computer) after it starts making faulty decisions. A crew member finally succeeds in shutting HAL down only after it has killed all the other crew members. HAL is an extreme example, but the principle ensures that an AI system’s actions do not override or contradict the actions and decision of the people responsible for the system.

On February 11, 2019, the president signed an executive order promoting the United States as a leader in the use of AI. In addition to addressing technical standards and workforce training, the order called for the protection of “civil liberties, privacy, and American values” in the application of AI systems. As the development of AI systems increases pace, it seems important that an ethical framework be put in place. Do you think these are reasonable and realistic guidelines that should be adopted? Do you think some of them will hinder the pace of AI application development? Are any principles missing?

Let us know what you think.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

 

March 25, 2019 in emerging payments, fintech, innovation | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

March 18, 2019


The Patriots of the Payments Landscape

Last February, the New England Patriots and their future first-ballot Hall of Fame quarterback, Tom Brady, won their sixth Super Bowl title since 2002. Over this 17-year period, they have played for the National Football League title nine times. In college football, a similar scenario has emerged, with two teams (the University of Alabama and Clemson University) winning seven out of the last 10 collegiate football national titles. It is proving to be very difficult to upend the dominant players in this sport, and many football fans and pundits believe that such domination makes the overall sport less interesting (especially if your favorite team isn’t Alabama, Clemson, or the Patriots). They think it’s bad for the sport and argue it would be better to see more variety in championship teams. As I think about that perspective, my mind drifts to a payments conversation that I am often a part of in both business and social settings: Where are payments going to be in the next three to five years?

While it would be much "more entertaining" in my social settings to be able to discuss some great shift in payments on the horizon, the fact is that right now payments is in a place similar to football’s. Card-based payments are sitting on top of the non-cash-based payments world and will be difficult to dethrone anytime soon. According to the Federal Reserve Payments Study 2016 (the last report that provided annual estimates for both automated clearinghouse (ACH) and check payments), card payments, by number of transactions, made up 72 percent of noncash payments. Now the latest figures from the payments study’s 2018 Annual Supplement report reveal that there were 123.5 billion card transactions in 2017, a figure representing robust growth of 10.1 percent from 2016. The report also highlights that, during this 2016–17 period, the number of network ACH payment transactions grew at an accelerated pace of 5.7 percent while large-institution check payments declined in number of transactions at an accelerated pace of 4.8 percent. The Federal Reserve is currently conducting its triennial payments study, which will provide updated national estimates on all noncash payments for 2018.

In the future, we might be dipping cards more often, tapping contactless cards, or even tapping our phones more, but it’s hard to envision a new payment channel making much headway in the next three to five years. Cards just have too big of a share and are experiencing accelerating growth. Consumers are not only accustomed to using them, but they also find that cards work very efficiently for them. And just like the football fans and pundits who talk or write about the need for different champions in the football world, payments professionals and pundits are enamored with writing about and discussing how blockchain, distributed ledger technology, faster payments, or some other brave, new technology are going to be the next frontier in payments. And you know, they might be right one day, but it’s not going to happen anytime soon, certainly not before Mr. Brady finds his way into the Hall of Fame.

Photo of Douglas King By Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

 

March 18, 2019 in credit cards, debit cards, emerging payments, fintech, innovation | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

March 11, 2019


Payments Webinar Explores a Fintech Talent Gap

Developments in financial technology (fintech), as welcome as they may be, are pressuring one of our most valuable resources: our workforce. Not only are there not enough candidates experienced in new fintech, but also there is a growing gap between the skills employers want and the skills that employed professionals have.

As fast as fintech is moving, it is important not to be hasty when making talent development decisions. Now is the time to be strategic and intentional in evaluating the ways to bridge the fintech talent gap. Most new banking technologies, especially those that are payments related (whether they’re offered by a traditional financial institution or a non-bank entity), require a new approach to software and cybersecurity. With this in mind, a fundamental feature of workforce development is aligning education and training programs with real business needs.

In the next episode of our Talk About Payments (TAP) webinar series, our panel will explore the underlying emerging technologies that are essential core knowledge for the payments and fintech workforce. We will also explore initiatives that are under way to bridge the fintech talent gap. Our panel will include:

  • Jessica J. Washington, AAP, Payments Risk Expert, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
  • James Senn, Founding Director, Georgia Fintech Academy
  • Allen Sautter, Information Security Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

We encourage financial institutions, merchants, fintechs, payments processors, law enforcement, academia, and other payments system stakeholders to participate. Participants will be able to submit questions during the webinar.

The webinar will take place on March 21, from 1 to 2 p.m. (ET). To participate in the webinar, you must register in advance (there is no charge). You can register here. Once you have registered, we will send you a confirmation email with the login and toll-free call-in information. You can direct questions concerning the webinar to David Lott at david.lott@atl.frb.org. We hope you will join us and be part of the discussion.

Photo of Jessica Washington By Jessica Washington, AAP, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

 

March 11, 2019 in emerging payments, financial technology, fintech, payments innovation, skills gap, workforce development | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

February 11, 2019


AI and Privacy: Achieving Coexistence

In a post early last year, I raised the issue of privacy rights in the use of big data. After attending the AI (artificial intelligence) Summit in New York City in December, I believe it is necessary to expand that call to the wider spectrum of technology that is under the banner of AI, including machine learning. There is no question that increased computing power, reduced costs, and improved developer skills have made machine learning programs more affordable and powerful. As discussed at the conference, the various facets of AI technology have reached far past financial services and fraud detection into numerous aspects of our life, including product marketing, health care, and public safety.

In May 2018, the White House announced the creation of the Select Committee on Artificial Intelligence. The main mission of the committee is "to improve the coordination of Federal efforts related to AI to ensure continued U.S. leadership in this field." It will operate under the National Science and Technology Committee and will have senior research and development officials from key governmental agencies. The White House's Office of Science and Technology Policy will oversee the committee.

Soon after, Congress established the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence in Title II, Section 238 of the 2019 John McCain National Defense Authorization Act. While the commission is independent, it operates within the executive branch. Composed of 15 members appointed by Congress and the Secretaries of Defense and Commerce—including representatives from Silicon Valley, academia, and NASA—the commission's aim is to "review advances in artificial intelligence, related machine learning developments, and associated technologies." It is also charged with looking at technologies that keep the United States competitive and considering the legal and ethical risks.

While the United States wants to retain its leadership position in AI, it cannot overlook AI's privacy and ethical implications. A national privacy advocacy group, EPIC (or the Electronic Privacy Information Center), has been lobbying hard to ensure that both the Select Committee on Artificial Intelligence and the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence obtain public input. EPIC has asked these groups to adopt the 12 Universal Guidelines for Artificial Intelligence released in October 2018 at the International Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners Conference in Brussels.

These guidelines, which I will discuss in more detail in a future post, are based on existing regulatory guidelines in the United States and Europe regarding data protection, human rights doctrine, and general ethical principles. They call out that any AI system with the potential to impact an individual's rights should have accountability and transparency and that humans should retain control over such systems.

As the strict privacy and data protection elements of the European Union's General Data Privacy Regulation take hold in Europe and spread to other parts of the world, I believe that privacy and ethical elements will gain a brighter spotlight and AI will be a major topic of discussion in 2019. What do you think?

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

February 11, 2019 in consumer protection, emerging payments, fintech, innovation, privacy, regulations | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

January 28, 2019


A Cryptocurrency Primer

Every day, my newsfeed is full of stories about cryptocurrency, blockchain, and distributed ledger technology. I even see stories on how we can create our own digital currency, a notion that conjures up for me visions of my face on a coin, just like suffragette Susan B. Anthony. Could my own digital currency, known hereafter as the NEDNote, become a reality? My husband is a software engineer, so the technical piece is covered, but maybe offering a primer on the history of cryptocurrency and its confusing and rapidly changing nomenclature is the best place to start before I launch the NEDNote into the cryptographic biosphere.

The concept of virtual currency as a substitute for fiat currency dates back to the 1980s, with David Chaum being credited with introducing digital cash. (Fiat currency, often referred to in cryptocurrency discussions, is legal tender backed by a government or central bank.) Although early attempts at virtual currencies were made in the late ’90s, the anonymous white paper published in 2009 under the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto is credited for creating the first decentralized cryptocurrency, Bitcoin, and the blockchain database. And with that paper, a new lexicon began to emerge, some of which I define here.

  • Cryptocurrency, short for cryptographic currency, is a subset of digital currency.
  • Cryptography in the cryptocurrency world refers to the algorithms that encrypt data for transmission. In the analog world, think how the Navajo language was used to transmit secure messages during World War II.
  • Distributed ledger technology (DLT) refers to the infrastructure that allows a repeated digital copy of data to be available at multiple locations. With DLT, transactions take place over a peer-to-peer network, and do not require the use of a central administrator to govern or validate the transaction, but rather employ consensus algorithms to replicate the data across locations.
  • Blockchain is a type of DLT that organizes records in blocks, which are then linked with cryptographic hashes to create the chain. Each block consists of these hashes, data, and a unique timestamp. Because no trusted source or authority exists for the blockchain, it is necessary that data somehow be validated before anything can be added.
  • Validation protocols include “proof-of-work” and “proof-of-stake,” the two primary methods of validating transactions on a blockchain.
    • Proof-of-work involves mining and timestamping, which are key validation computations. Mining both validates transactions and obtains new cryptocurrency. The mathematical calculations performed in the mining process build the hash function that links the block to the chain. Miners are rewarded with new cryptocurrency for their contributions to the validation process. Timestamping tracks historical changes made to the data contained in the block.
    • Proof-of-stake employs a consensus method to determine ownership of the cryptocurrency. This method requires less computing power to complete than does proof-of-work validation but does not reward miners with new currency.
  • A crypto wallet provider is a cryptocurrency storage service that is online (hot wallet) or offline (cold storage). Hot wallets are connected to the internet and are frequently hosted by an online exchange platform. Cold storage, which is not connected to the internet, is viewed as more secure.

For many years, my husband allowed the SETI Institute to harness the excess processing power of our home computers in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, when we could have been mining for cryptocurrency and making the NEDNote a reality. In my next post, I’ll talk about how cryptocurrencies are exchanged and some of the associated risks.

Photo of Nancy-Donahue  By Nancy Donahue, project manager in the Retail Payments Risk Forum  at the Atlanta Fed

January 28, 2019 in currency, fintech, innovation | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

December 10, 2018


A Look in the Rearview Mirror of Payments for 2018

I'm sure just about everyone else in the payments industry would agree with me that 2018 was yet another exciting year for payments. The year was filled with a host of newsworthy events, but fintech most certainly took center stage in the financial services industry, including payments. Whether the news highlighted an announcement of a new product to increase financial access or discussed the regulatory challenges and associated concerns within the fintech space, it seemed that fintech made its way into the news on a daily basis. Still, for payments, 2018 will be remembered for more than just fintech.

The Retail Payments Risk Forum's last Talk About Payments webinar of 2018 will feature Doug King, Dave Lott, and Jessica Washington sharing their perspectives and memories on the year-in-payments in a round table discussion. Among the topics they will discuss are consumer payment preferences, the changing retail environment, and the state of fraud—and fintech, of course. We encourage financial institutions, retailers, payments processors, law enforcement, academia, and other payments system stakeholders to participate in this webinar. Participants will be able to submit questions during the webinar.

The webinar will be held on Thursday, December 20, from 1 to 2 p.m. (ET). Participation in the webinar is free, but you must register in advance. To register, click on the TAP webinar link. After you complete your registration, you will receive a confirmation email with all the log-in and toll-free call-in information. A recording of the webinar will be available to all registered participants in various formats within a couple of weeks.

We look forward to you joining us on December 20 and sharing your perspectives on the major payment themes of 2018.

Photo of Douglas King By Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed


December 10, 2018 in banking regulations, banks and banking, crime, cybercrime, emerging payments, fintech, innovation, payments fraud | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

Google Search



Recent Posts


Archives


Categories


Powered by TypePad