About


Take On Payments, a blog sponsored by the Retail Payments Risk Forum of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, is intended to foster dialogue on emerging risks in retail payment systems and enhance collaborative efforts to improve risk detection and mitigation. We encourage your active participation in Take on Payments and look forward to collaborating with you.

Take On Payments

August 5, 2019


A Call to Action on Friendly Card Fraud and Loss?

I have recently had two conversations about the topics of friendly fraud and loss, one from a merchant's perspective and another from a financial institution's issuer perspective. Friendly fraud is often used interchangeably with first-party fraud, as was the case in the conversations, but they are quite different. First-party, sometimes called "bust-out," fraud occurs when an individual applies for and receives a loan or credit line with no intention of ever making a payment. (The term "bust-out" comes from when the individual maxes out the credit, getting as much "free" stuff as possible and making no plans to pay.) First-party fraud is generally considered credit fraud and not payment fraud.

Friendly fraud occurs when a cardholder disputes a transaction that the cardholder never intended to pay even though products or services were properly rendered. Sometimes cardholders dispute legitimate transactions that they honestly do not recognize or remember—think of an annual recurring charge that might slip a cardholder's mind, or the merchant name on the statement is the parent company and not the more easily recognized d/b/a store name. If the resolution of such a dispute is such that either the merchant or issuer takes a loss, this is not true payment card fraud but should be classified as a loss rather than fraud.

The two conversations were clearly around friendly fraud and loss situations that are transaction fraud rather than credit account fraud. Both the merchant and financial institution claimed that friendly fraud and loss transactions are growing rapidly yet are not necessarily being properly captured or categorized. One of the organizations even went so far as to suggest that third-party card fraud is being greatly overstated because a significant portion of that fraud is actually friendly fraud and loss, and this mismeasurement is directing fraud discussions and mitigation decisions away from creating ways to better identify and mitigate friendly card fraud and loss.

So I issue a call to action for Take on Payments readers with multiple questions:

  • What is your experience with friendly fraud and loss?
  • Are you able to track these independently of third-party fraud?
  • If so, are you seeing growth in friendly fraud and loss, as the merchant and financial institution stated was happening?
  • What's the driving force in the friendly fraud and loss that you are experiencing?
  • Does this particular fraud warrant more discussion by the industry, and in particular the Risk Forum, as it has not been an area of focus of ours relative to third-party card fraud?

Feel free to email me at douglas.a.king@atl.frb.org or use the comment button below. I would greatly value your thoughts on this topic.

Photo of Douglas King By Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed


August 5, 2019 in credit cards, debt, payments fraud | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

September 24, 2013


Using Analytics to Improve Credit Quality

With consumer credit products such as mortgages and payday loans occupying headlines, credit card portfolios have been quietly and steadily marching towards improvement in quality over the last three years, according to data released by the Fed’s Board of Governors. As the chart shows, seasonally adjusted charge-off rates are down to 3.9 percent, and delinquency rates are at 2.6 percent for the largest 100 commercial banks in the United States, the lowest rate since the Federal Reserve began tracking this statistic at the start of 1991.

Credit Card Charge-Offs and Delinquency Rates: Top 100 US Commercial Banks

But how have credit card issuers been able to improve the quality and profitability of their card portfolio since the severe economic impact felt by all during the recession? One of the many tools the Board identified—and one cited by portfolio managers—is the increasing use of analytics. Issuers collect and comb vast amounts of data from a variety of sources to ensure that cardholders are equipped to manage their balances.

Credit issuers use analytics for a variety of purposes, including establishing credit limits, monitoring ongoing credit quality, targeting marketing efforts, and detecting fraud. They perform analytics at the individual cardholder level—looking at credit history and purchasing patterns, for example—as well as at the customer segmentation level to identify correlations between certain data elements and indicators of potential changes in credit quality. The increased power of these analytical tools over the last decade is due primarily to the incredible advancements in data collection and analysis technology. These advances have provided issuers with the ability to run sophisticated "what if" models to determine how changes in various key attributes of cardholders or in the overall economic environment will affect the quality of their portfolio.

Clearly, many of the issuers have taken other proven steps to improve the credit quality of their portfolios: they’ve reduced credit lines and increased payment monitoring management for existing accounts during and after the recession. And they applied more stringent credit policies, making it more difficult for new applicants to be approved (or likelier to be approved at lower credit limits than they would have been before). These are all sound risk management techniques. But data analytics has been a very powerful additional tool, allowing issuers to make huge strides in ensuring ongoing credit quality.

How are you using increased technology capabilities to improve your risk management capabilities?

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a retail payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

September 24, 2013 in cards, debt, innovation, payments study | Permalink

Comments

Data and analytics can provide a competitive advantage for financial institutions (FIs) of all sizes. Sophisticated models can lead to better decisions and improve your institution's risk management, marketing, price optimization, offer optimization, and more. Arguably, the most important area is risk management. FIs need to find their happy median for risk. Effective decisioning won’t be profitable if high-risk customers are approved for too many cards or approved for credit limits that will overreach their ability to pay, but FIs also don’t want to necessarily turn a consumer away due to an address discrepancy. The FIs that can most effectively leverage their data and analytics will gain the competitive edge. It appears many credit card issuers have already figured this out.

Posted by: Christina Lysacek | October 21, 2013 at 02:53 PM

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

Google Search



Recent Posts


Archives


Categories


Powered by TypePad