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Take On Payments, a blog sponsored by the Retail Payments Risk Forum of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, is intended to foster dialogue on emerging risks in retail payment systems and enhance collaborative efforts to improve risk detection and mitigation. We encourage your active participation in Take on Payments and look forward to collaborating with you.

Take On Payments

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September 25, 2017


Fed Payments Webinar Series Launching

One of the comments we consistently received when we conducted the Mobile Banking/Payments Survey last fall was the desire for the Atlanta Federal Reserve to provide more educational opportunities on current payment technologies and issues. Not only have small and mid-sized financial institutions expressed this need, but so have consumer advocacy groups and law enforcement agencies. Educational efforts, along with research, on payment risk issues are at the core of the Retail Payments Risk Forum's overall mission.

In response to these requests, the Risk Forum is launching a webinar series called Talk About Payments (TAP). The TAP webinars will supplement this blog, forums and conferences we convene, and other works we publish on the Forum's web pages. The current plan is for the webinars to be presented once a quarter. Financial institutions, retailers, payment processors, law enforcement, academia, and other payment system stakeholders are all welcome to participate in the webinars. Participants can submit questions during the event.

We will have our first webinar—titled "How Safe Are Mobile Payments?"—on Thursday, October 5, from 1 to 2 p.m. (ET). The webinar will cover such topics as mcommerce growth, mobile wallets, tokenization, fraud attack points, and risk mitigation tools and tactics.

Participation in the webinar is complimentary, but you must register in advance. To register, go to the TAP webinar web page. After you complete your registration, you will receive a confirmation email with all the log-in and toll-free call-in information.

We hope you will join us for our first webinar on October 5, and for our future webinars. If there are any particular topics you would like for us to cover in future webinars, please let us know.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

 

 

September 25, 2017 in emerging payments, mobile banking, mobile payments, payments risk | Permalink

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September 18, 2017


The Rising Cost of Remittances to Mexico Bucks a Trend

From time to time, I like to look back at previous Risk Forum activities and see what payment topics we've covered and consider whether we should revisit any. In September 2012, the Risk Forum hosted the Symposium on 1073: Exploring the Final Remittance Transfer Rule and Path Forward. Seeing that almost five years have passed since that event, I decided I'd take another, deeper look to better understand some of the effects that Section 1073 of the Dodd-Frank Act has had on remittances since then. I wrote about some of my findings in a paper.

As a result of my deeper look, I found an industry that has been rife with change since the implementation of Section 1073 rules, from both a regulatory and technology perspective. Emerging companies have entered the landscape, new digital products have appeared, and several traditional financial institutions have exited the remittance industry. In the midst of this change, consumers' average cost to send remittances has declined.

Conversely, the cost to send remittances within the largest corridor, United States–Mexico, is rising. The rising cost is not attributable to the direct remittance fee paid to an agent or digital provider but rather to the exchange rate margin, which is the exchange rate markup applied to the consumer's remittance over the interbank exchange rate. As remittances become more digitalized and the role of in-person agents diminishes, I expect the exchange rate margin portion of the total cost of remittance to continue to grow.

Even though the average cost of sending remittances to Mexico is on the rise, I found that consumers have access to a number of low-cost options. The spread between the highest-cost remittance options and the lowest-cost options is significant.

Figure-11

With greater transparency than ever before in the remittance industry, consumers now have the ability to find and use low-cost remittance options across a wide variety of provider types and product options. To read more about the cost and availability of remittances from the United States to Mexico and beyond in a post-1073-rule world, you can find the paper here.

Photo of Douglas King By Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

 

September 18, 2017 in payments risk, regulations, regulators, remittances, Section 1073, transmitters | Permalink

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September 11, 2017


Identity Theft Part 2: Prevention

In an August 28 post, I wrote about the growing problem of identity theft. Criminals can be a determined lot, and no single tactic is 100 percent perfect. Still, there are a number of measures you can take to reduce your and your family's risk of becoming a victim of identity theft.

These tactics include:

  • Contact the three major credit bureaus and request the creation of a credit file of any minor children and then place a "freeze" on the credit record. The Social Security numbers of minors are a favorite target in identity theft schemes since years go by before children reach majority age and apply for credit. Unfortunately, no federal law addresses a credit freeze capability for minors, so the ability to do so varies with each state, as do any applicable fees.
  • You should consider placing a credit security freeze on your account, too. Such a freeze blocks access to your credit file without your permission. Again, the requirements and fees, as well as the process for removing a freeze (permanently or temporarily) vary with each state.
  • Take advantage of reviewing your credit report once a year at no charge with all of the major credit bureaus to spot any accounts that may have been opened without your knowledge. There are a number of companies offering to help you review your credit report (sometimes for a fee), but you should go to the official site annually to access your reports at no charge.
  • Secure your Social Security number and provide it only to third parties when absolutely necessary. You should not carry it with you in case your wallet or purse is lost or stolen.
  • Promptly review account statements including utility bills to verify transactions to ensure that account information such as contact email address and phone numbers have not been altered.
  • Collect your mail daily and place delivery holds on mail when you will be away from home for three or more days.
  • Destroy any credit offers you do not plan to accept. If you do not wish to receive prescreened credit and insurance offers, you can opt out by calling (888) 567-8688 or visiting optoutprescreen.com.
  • Shred other documents containing personal or financial information to prevent criminals going through your garbage to find such information.

We hope this information will be helpful in stemming the growing tide of identity fraud in this country. If you have other suggestions, please share them.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

 

September 11, 2017 in data security, identity theft | Permalink

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