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Take On Payments, a blog sponsored by the Retail Payments Risk Forum of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, is intended to foster dialogue on emerging risks in retail payment systems and enhance collaborative efforts to improve risk detection and mitigation. We encourage your active participation in Take on Payments and look forward to collaborating with you.

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March 30, 2015


Safely Motoring the Payments Highway

I've ridden a motorcycle for 30-plus years and, except for a slight bump from behind by a car when I was stopped at a four-way stop sign, I have a perfect safety record. Some say I'm lucky. While there is probably some element of truth to that—I've made it through a number of dangerous situations over the years—I believe my good safety record is largely because early on in my riding days, I invested in proper safety clothing and took classes in motorcycle riding skills and safety. In addition, when I've been out on the road, risk management has played an integral role in my safety: I follow the Motorcycle Safety Foundation's recommended practice of S-I-P-D-E: scan, identify, predict, decide, and execute.

I recently took advantage of an early spring day and rode the North Georgia back roads. Later that evening, when I thought back over my day, I couldn't help but think of the parallel between motorcycling risk management and payments risk management. To maintain a good safety record in both, you should practice SIPDE. Here's how SIPDE can work with payments.

Scan: Constantly examine the environment you are in. Don't focus on a particular payment method or channel or you will get target fixation and be likely to miss threats to other payment types. How often have we heard that while resources were focused on responding to a distributed denial of service attack, the criminals took advantage of the distraction and executed some unauthorized transactions? When riding, I try to always be alert and I constantly move my sight lines to spot any dangers.

Identify: As you conduct your examination, identify all potential risks. Some may be immediately apparent, and some may be hidden. Some may be major threats, and others less serious. While most of the criminal threats will come from external elements, don't forget about insider fraud.

Predict: After you have identified the risks, run through scenarios as to potential outcomes given a variety of circumstances. I sometimes change my lane position to increase my visibility and always cover the brake lever to prepare for that emergency stop. You must certainly consider the worst-case scenario, but don't forget that an accumulation of less-severe situations may result in a loss that is just as big.

Decide: After weighing all the options and the likelihood of their panning out, determine your course of action so that you're ready if one of the scenarios becomes a reality. Reaction time is critical with motorcycle riding and dealing with criminal attacks.

Execute: Put into motion that course of action to deal with the risk. This is where your training, skills, and tools come into play, helping you to properly and completely execute your plan.

Just as when I ride and the environmental factors and potential threats around me are constantly changing, such is the case in our payments environment. We must constantly use our S-I-P-D-E skills to assess and react to the environment, whether that's the road you're riding on or the payments environment you're operating in.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed


March 30, 2015 in consumer protection , risk management | Permalink

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