About


Take On Payments, a blog sponsored by the Retail Payments Risk Forum of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, is intended to foster dialogue on emerging risks in retail payment systems and enhance collaborative efforts to improve risk detection and mitigation. We encourage your active participation in Take on Payments and look forward to collaborating with you.

Take On Payments

« July 2013 | Main | September 2013 »

August 26, 2013


Caution, Online Payday Lender Ahead

Payday lenders offer consumers short-term unsecured loans with high fees and interest rates. Payday loans—also referred to as deposit advance loans or payday advances—are a form of credit that some consumers may find appealing for a number of reasons, including an inability to qualify for other credit sources. The borrower usually pays the loan back on the next payday—hence the term "payday loan"—which means the underwriting process typically includes a history of payroll and related employment records.

A growing number of payday lenders operate their businesses virtually. Consumers can obtain loans and authorize repayment of the loans and fees during the same online session. In a typical online payday loan scenario, a borrower obtains a loan and provides authorization for the lender to send Automated Clearing House (ACH) debits to the consumer's account at a later date for repayment. The payday lender's bank can originate the debits through the ACH network. Wire transfer and remotely created checks may be other payment options.

Both state and federal regulators are currently focusing on the payday lending industry to protect consumers from illegal payday loans. Payday lending practices are usually regulated on the state level. Some states prohibit payday lending, while others require lenders to be licensed and to comply with maximum fees, loan amounts, and interest rate caps, among other restrictions. On the federal level, the Dodd-Frank Act has given the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau the authority to address deceptive and abusive practices by payday lenders.

Payday lenders' banks should consider all the risks involved with working with online payday lenders. And they should make sure to incorporate due diligence techniques and to become familiar with the available tools.

Reputation, reputation, reputation
First, there is reputational risk. A payday lender's bank should be aware that a business relationship—including ACH origination activity—with a company making illegal payday loans can damage the bank's image. Reputation can suffer even if the bank is not complicit in the illegal activities of its payday lender customer. But once a financial institution determines that facilitating payments on behalf of online payday lenders falls within its risk management model, it should ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Providing periodic reports on ACH customers to the bank's board of directors is one way to facilitate review of whether these customers' activities remain within the bank's risk management model. It is critical that the bank protect its reputation, as that affects every part of its business.

The importance of know-your-customer practices
The payday lender's bank should also develop and follow adequate due diligence procedures. ACH rules require—and regulatory guidance advises—that banks perform "know your customer" (KYC) due diligence. KYC includes a variety of activities such as assessing the nature of the online payday lender's activities, setting appropriate restrictions on the types of entries and exposure limits for the lender, and monitoring origination and return activity.

Due diligence steps can include: 1) identifying the business's principal owners, 2) reviewing ratings for the business from the Better Business Bureau, consumer complaint sites, and credit service companies, and 3) determining if there have been recent legal actions against the business. A thoughtful review of the lender's website, including the terms of the consumer's authorization agreement as well as promotional materials, is advised. These due diligence practices during onboarding and on an ongoing basis for all merchants—including online payday lenders—help the bank with setting and enforcing appropriate restrictions for the customer and therefore mitigate the risk of the bank discovering a problem when it is too late.

Mitigating problems by being proactive
Banks can develop tools that flag potential problems in-house or obtain them from vendors, ACH operators, or NACHA. In addition, incorporating a process to monitor transactions and returns to identify anomalies can be very useful. An anomaly could, for example, be a sudden uptick in returns or an unusual increase in origination volume or average dollar amount. Detecting anomalies can be a trigger to conduct further research with a customer.

Other tools can be NACHA's originator watch list and vendor-terminated originator databases, which can help banks identify customers that may warrant additional scrutiny. Periodic audits can also be a useful tool to identify rules compliance issues.

For a bank, protecting its reputation is paramount when it is considering offering payment services to high-risk originators like online payday lenders. It should exercise caution, performing risk-based due diligence on new customers and then diligently monitoring current customers so it can identify problems early and address them proactively.

Photo of Deborah ShawBy Deborah Shaw, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

August 26, 2013 in ACH, consumer protection, online banking fraud, regulations | Permalink

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
https://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a01053688c61a970c01901f04d739970b

Listed below are links to blogs that reference Caution, Online Payday Lender Ahead:

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

August 19, 2013


Curbing Identity Theft and Fraud

To no one's surprise, identity theft and associated fraud losses rose again in 2012. The number of victims climbed to more than 12 million last year, an 11 percent increase over 2011, according to the recently released Javelin 2013 Identity Fraud Report. Losses amounted to almost $21 billion.

Identity Theft Victims and Fraud Amounts

A quick distinction between identity theft and identity fraud: identity theft is when an unauthorized person obtains personal information about an individual, and identity fraud occurs when someone uses that personal information, without the individual's consent, to conduct financial transactions.

Two types of identity theft drove the overall increase: new-account identity and account takeover fraud.

New-account identity fraud takes a number of different forms. The most common form occurs with credit card applications. Someone creates an account using another person's information and makes purchases to the maximum limit, then allows the account to go into default. The next most common type happens with new checking accounts. The fraudster opens up a checking account using false identification credentials, then deposits bad or bogus checks and quickly cashes out.

The prevention of new-account identity fraud rests primarily on the shoulders of the financial institution (FI). What are the steps that FIs can take to help reduce the levels of these types of fraud? They are already required to authenticate the identities of new account applicants to the extent reasonable and practical under the Bank Secrecy Act's Customer Identification Program. The fraudster's goal when opening a fraudulent account is to minimize the verification process and quickly establish the new account. Experienced criminals can falsify government-issued IDs without too much difficulty. The FI representatives authenticating new accounts must rely on their experience and on a number of other factors to detect fraudulent attempts—but it can be difficult to balance the need to authenticate applicants with the wish, and the institutional push, to be polite and welcoming.

Many FIs order abbreviated credit reports as part of the new account process so they can better market credit products to qualified applicants. An address on the credit report that differs from the one on the application or the report showing a rash of new credit inquiries should sound warning bells, and such discrepancies would justify additional verification. Other warning signs include applicants having to read the information from their identification documents rather than reciting it from memory, or incorrect social security numbers, or newly issued identification documents.

Most fraudulent new accounts are opened online or through call centers. In these cases, the subsequent new-customer authentication process is critical. Although individuals can use their own, legitimate credentials to commit new account fraud, industry reports suggest it is much more common for fraudulent accounts to be opened with fraudulent credentials.

As to account takeover fraud, as we have stressed on many occasions, the most critical action that FIs can engage in is frequent customer education through electronic and print media and community and customer seminars. In a recent post on phishing, we outlined a number of steps that FIs should remind individuals to follow to minimize the possibility of having their accounts and identity credentials compromised.

We would like to hear from you as to ways your institution is combating new-account identity and account takeover fraud.

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a retail payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

August 19, 2013 in account takeovers, authentication, banks and banking, consumer fraud, identity theft | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

August 5, 2013


Gone Phishing: How Your Employees' Bad Security Habits Can Impact Your Business

Phishing is the practice of sending an e-mail that appears to originate from a legitimate representative of a company or government agency in an effort to get the recipient to click on an embedded link. The link takes the individual to a cleverly disguised imposter of a legitimate website. Here, the targeted victim is asked to enter various account credentials that the criminal records and uses later to access the individual's accounts. A refined version of phishing, known as "spear-phishing," targets specific employees to try to gain access to their companies' financial accounts or files. At mid-sized to large companies, such an e-mail could appear to be an internal directive from HR or IT.

While early phishing efforts were easier to spot through their spelling and grammatical errors or poor company logo reproductions, many criminals have become more sophisticated. They now produce well written and convincing messages with high-quality graphics that make the messages appear legitimate and create a sense of urgency. In some cases, a criminal's success in writing a convincing message comes through the practice of social engineering. He or she "researches" targeted individuals by gathering information about their interests, activities, family, and friend names, travels and other personal information through their social network sites. The criminal weaves some of this information into the phishing message. For example, if the criminal sees you are an avid golfer, you might get an e-mail that seems to be from a sporting goods company asking you to enter a sweepstakes contest to win a set of clubs. Most people would never think of providing information such as birthday, place of birth, or other personal data to a stranger they meet on the street, but often do so without hesitation on social websites.

Many employers provide periodic workplace security training including warnings not to click on links that are unknown or appear to be suspicious. Despite such efforts, an investigation conducted after a criminal online intrusion generally reveals that an employee did such a thing to start the chain of events. That employee's actions resulted in the disclosure of the information necessary to illegally access the company's accounts or to download malware into the employee's computer that sniffed for the account credential information and later relayed it to the criminal. Unfortunately, many small businesses neglect this education and find themselves victims of major financial losses that can threaten the viability of their entire businesses.

There are hardware and software solutions that provide some layer of protection to a business, but the best protection is having educated and aware employees who receive frequent training and reminders about the importance of solid workplace computer safety practices. Employees must be made to understand that lax or weak online security practices in their personal lives can be harmful to themselves and to their employers.

Tell us: how do you protect yourself and your business from phishing?

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a retail payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

August 5, 2013 in cybercrime, fraud, malware | Permalink

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
https://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a01053688c61a970c01910497c249970c

Listed below are links to blogs that reference Gone Phishing: How Your Employees' Bad Security Habits Can Impact Your Business:

Comments

Post a comment

Comments are moderated and will not appear until the moderator has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign in

Google Search



Recent Posts


Archives


Categories


Powered by TypePad