Take On Payments

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Take On Payments, a blog sponsored by the Retail Payments Risk Forum of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, is intended to foster dialogue on emerging risks in retail payment systems and enhance collaborative efforts to improve risk detection and mitigation. We encourage your active participation in Take on Payments and look forward to collaborating with you.

September 19, 2016


Mobile Banking and Payments—What's Changed?

This week, the Federal Reserve Banks of Atlanta, Boston, Cleveland, Dallas, Kansas City, Minneapolis, and Richmond are launching an online mobile banking and payments survey to financial institutions based in their respective districts. The purpose of the survey is to achieve better understanding of the status of mobile banking and payments initiatives, products, and services that financial institutions offer in the various regions of the country. The results of the survey at the individual district level should be available to participants by mid-December; a consolidated report for all the districts will be published in early 2017.

The last survey, which had 625 participants, was conducted in the fall of 2014. That was before the launch of the various major mobile wallets operating today, so it will be interesting to see what level of impact these wallets have had on the mobile payments activity of financial institutions. You can find the results of the 2014 Sixth District survey on our website. This survey effort complements the 2016 Consumer and Mobile Financial Services survey conducted by the Federal Reserve Board's Division of Consumer and Community Affairs.

First designed by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston in 2008, the survey has been updated over the years to reflect the many changes that have taken place in the mobile landscape in the United States. Similar to past surveys, the 2016 survey looks to capture:

  • Number of banks and credit unions offering mobile banking and payment services
  • Types of mobile services offered or planned
  • Mobile technology platforms supported
  • Features of mobile services offered or planned
  • Benefits and business drivers associated with mobile services
  • Consumer and business adoption/usage of mobile services
  • Barriers to providing mobile services
  • Future plans related to mobile payment services

If your financial institution is based in one of the participating districts and has not received an invitation to participate in this year's survey, please contact your district's Federal Reserve Bank. For the Sixth District, you can contact me via email or at 404-498-7529. You can also contact me if you need assistance in locating your district's lead survey coordinator.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

September 19, 2016 in banks and banking, financial services, mobile banking, payments | Permalink

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June 27, 2016


Between a Rock and a Hard Place?

Customer education encouraging safe payments practices has always been viewed by staff at the Retail Payments Risk Forum as a vital element in mitigating payments-related fraud. We have stressed this need time and time again in our posts as well as our numerous speaking engagements at payments-related conferences and events.

Financial institutions (FIs) have generally been identified as the group that should bear this responsibility as they own the account relationship, but with more intermediaries in the payments process, I think that others should also be involved. The advent of mobile banking and payments has introduced even more challenges since the financial institution doesn't get involved in the acquisition of the mobile device as that is normally handled by the mobile network sales representatives. My personal experience with these sales representatives is that once the device sale is done, they are more interested in selling me accessories or upgrading my data plan than they are teaching me about selecting and setting strong passwords or preventing malware and viruses from finding their way into my phone.

When I raise this issue with others, all too often I hear a pessimistic chorus that getting consumers to adopt strong security practices will always be a losing battle for FIs. They say that consumers will always choose convenience over security—that is, until they fall victim to fraud. And forget about any other player in the ecosystem taking on the education responsibility because if they have no liability for fraud losses, why direct funds to education when they could be deployed elsewhere?

The impact of fraud on a consumer's relationship with his or her financial institution has never been greater. We read every day about the increasing economic importance of the Gen Y or millennial segment. With an estimated 80 million people, they represent the largest segment of our country's bankable population. A late 2015 study by FICO on millennial banking habits revealed that 29 percent of respondents indicated that they would close all their accounts with a financial institution if one of those accounts experienced fraud. To make matters worse, one quarter of the survey participants indicated they would write a negative post on social media about their financial institution if they experienced a fraud incident.

So are financial institutions in a no-win situation? A ray of hope emerges from the same FICO study, which states that 41 percent of the millennials surveyed indicated that they recommended their FI to friends, colleagues, or family members after a positively handled fraud incident. Studies have consistently shown that payment security is a key concern of all customers, not just millennials. So although it may not seem fair that financial institutions have to shoulder most of the security education effort, the impact of not doing so could be significant. Perhaps it is time for a coordinated payments industry campaign to encourage consumers to adopt safer and more secure banking practices.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

June 27, 2016 in banks and banking, financial services, payments, risk | Permalink

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May 23, 2016


What Would Happen If the Lights Went Out for a Long, Long Time?

In 1859, a massive geomagnetic solar storm known as the Carrington Event caused extensive damage to telegraph systems and other nascent electrical devices worldwide. Telegraph lines sparked and telegraph operators could send and receive messages without the use of electric batteries. The Northern Lights lit up the sky in all of North America. Though not widely reported, on July 23, 2012 a massive cloud of solar material similar in magnitude to the Carrington storm erupted off the sun's surface, radiating out at 7.5 million miles per hour. Fortunately the impact of the solar storm missed Earth by nine days because of the Earth's orbit position.

One report estimates that a Carrington-level storm today could result in power outages affecting as many as 20–40 million Americans for a duration ranging from 16 days to two years at an economic cost of up to 2.5 trillion dollars. A research paper in Space Weather estimated the odds of a Carrington-level storm at about 12 percent over the next 10 years. Early warning of such a storm is possible since satellites can detect impending storms and have the potential to provide a minimum one-day warning before it hits Earth.

So what would happen if the lights went out in much of the United States because of such a cataclysmic event? One could anticipate serious disruption of electronic payments such as ACH, cards, and wire transfers in the affected areas and beyond. What would one do to facilitate commerce in such an emergency? Well, cash and, to a lesser degree, checks could come to the fore. Use of checks would be problematic given the electronification of checks, high risk of fraud, and overdrawn accounts if banking systems are not up and running. Cash would have fewer problems if it were on hand to distribute to the affected population. Perhaps cash accompanied by ration books could be used to mitigate hoarding.

For a low-probability extreme-impact event that results in cash becoming the only way, among existing payment instruments, for commerce to take place, what contingency plans are in place to ensure that consumers and businesses can obtain cash? Since the contingency systems we have in place to handle a future Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Sandy are likely not sufficient for an extreme event of nationwide scale, some of the issues that need to be resolved include:

  • How does one ensure that sufficient cash is on hand during an emergency?
  • How is cash going to be distributed and accounted for along the supply chain with ATMs and bank offices and their core systems inoperable due to no electricity?

Addressing these questions and others involves a monumental effort, and I don't have a ready answer. Fortunately, cash solves the problem for small-scale, low-value payments during a long-term power outage. That is, during the immediate, in-person exchange, it is an instrument that doesn't require electricity, communication networks, or computers.

This and other major calamities have always made me concerned about the push in some quarters for a full transition to electronic payments at the expense of payments less reliant on electricity and our communication networks. As an engineer by training, it is in my nature to wonder what can go awry if failsafe systems aren't in place when the unexpected happens.

With the possibility of a catastrophic event in our lifetime, would you rather have cash in hand or a card/mobile app? As for me, I'm going to the bank to cash out my accounts and then on to the hardware store to buy a gas-powered electric generator. Just kidding, though I think serious consideration and appreciation is needed for the contingency aspects of cash when things invariably go awry.

Photo of Steven Cordray  By Steven Cordray, payments risk expert in the Retail  Payments Risk  Forum at the Atlanta Fed

May 23, 2016 in ACH, cards, checks, payments | Permalink

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November 30, 2015


Half Full or Half Empty?

My colleagues and I in the Retail Payments Risk Forum participate as speakers or attendees in what sometimes seems to be a nonstop stream of banking and payments conferences that run from mid-September to mid-November. This effort is part of our mission to support the education of the stakeholders in the payments ecosystem with a focus on payments risk. We also use the opportunity to network with other attendees and vendors to stay on top of the latest developments and market solutions that are being deployed to combat payments fraud. These events also give us a chance to provide our perspective on trends and key issues involving payment risk.

At a recent fraud conference, I was on a panel discussing fraud trends and key threat vectors. The moderator of the panel revealed some results from Information Security Media Group's 2014 Faces of Fraud survey of financial institutions (FIs). There was a specific question about whether FIs had seen a change in the level of losses from account takeover fraud since the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council issued its supplemental guidance on Internet banking authentication in 2011. That guidance directed financial institutions to evaluate "new and evolving threats to online accounts and adjust their customer authentication, layered security, and other controls as appropriate in response to identified risks." The survey results are shown in the chart below.

graphic-chart

Source: 2014 Faces of Fraud Survey, Information Security Media Group

While the moderator and some of the other panelists seemed to focus on the 20 percent who said they had seen an increase in fraud, I had the perspective of the glass being half full by the 55 percent who indicated that the fraud had stayed about the same or decreased. Given the certainty that the number and magnitude of data breaches have increased and that the number of attempts by criminals to commit some sort of payment fraud through account takeovers was significantly up, I opined that since the fraud levels for the majority of the FIs had stayed at the same level or declined should be considered as a victory.

Certainly, I am not saying the tide has turned and the criminals are on their way to retirement, but I think the payments industry stakeholders should take some pride that its efforts to combat payment fraud are making some progress through the continuing development and deployment of anti-fraud tools. Am I being too Pollyannaish?

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

November 30, 2015 in banks and banking, crime, cybercrime, fraud, payments | Permalink

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November 9, 2015


Is the Payment Franchise Up for Grabs?

I have lost count on the number of discussions at payment conferences over the last few years on this topic of financial institutions (FI) losing the payment franchise to various new payment start-ups and business models. This very topic was the focus of a session at the Code/Mobile conference in October that featured executives from Chase and PayPal debating "Will Banks Eat Payments, or Will Payments Eat The Banks?" This idea was stuck on my mind while I was recently reading Fidelity National Information Service's 2015 Consumer Banking Index Report. This report reveals the findings from a survey of a thousand household decision makers who ranked 18 attributes according to their importance and according to the respondents' perception of how well banks perform. I readily admit that one shouldn't read too much into the results of a single survey, but the results in the payments and product-related category really grabbed my attention.

blog-visual

Consumer expectations for their financial institution to provide digital payment options through more innovative products than other financial institutions scored extremely low in the importance category. Digital payments ranked as the 14th out of 18 attributes in importance, and delivering leading-edge products was the least important attribute surveyed. Though the importance of these two attributes was significantly lower than security and reliability attributes, consumers rated the performance of their financial institution on these two attributes favorably.

My interpretation of the survey is that consumers aren't expecting much from their FI when it comes to delivering digital payments and innovative products yet the FIs are exceeding these light expectations. The survey does not cover whether consumers place importance on others—say, non-bank payment providers—offering innovative products and payment options and how they are delivering on consumers' expectations.

If consumers expect non-FIs to provide digital payment options, then perhaps FIs are in danger of losing the payments franchise. Maybe consumers don't place a lot of importance on digital payment options because they are satisfied with the options their FIs provide and so the risk to FIs losing the payment franchise to non-FIs is low.

It's possible that the consumer falls somewhere in the middle of the two scenarios above. They may be pleased with the offerings of their FIs, which offer ubiquity and are not highly differentiated, so their expectations for options are low. The non-FI payments space is fragmented with new payment options being developed and deployed at a rapid pace that will take time for consumers to digest. Should consumers realize that any of these offerings present a significant improvement in the payments experience, they may raise their expectations for their FIs. This would suggest that the non-FI providers haven't fully delivered on a compelling, ubiquitous, and widely adopted offering yet.

I believe FIs remain firmly entrenched in the payment space today. However, the level of investment and innovation taking place in the industry should capture the FIs' attention. Consumers, me included, are a finicky bunch when it comes to expectations, and these expectations can change almost instantly with the amount of innovation occurring today. I see no reason why the digital payments arena would be any different, and FIs that fail to realize this as they consider future payment options risk a declining share of the payment franchise.

By Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

November 9, 2015 in banks and banking, innovation, payments | Permalink

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October 19, 2015


Got Cash?

The governments in countries such as Sweden and Nigeria may have taken initial steps to move to a "cashless" nation, but here in the United States, there is no question that cash is still king. It remains the most-used retail payment instrument, especially for low-value payments. This finding from the Fed's Cash Product Office (CPO) was welcome news to a group of independent (nonfinancial institution) ATM operators that I had the pleasure of addressing last month at their annual conference. The primary business of these entrepreneurs is getting cash into the hands of consumers through their terminals located in a variety of malls and merchandise, food, and beverage stores. Of the estimated 400,000–425, 000 ATMs and cash dispensers operating in the United States, approximately 60 percent are owned by these nonfinancial institutions.

One of the CPO's main missions is maintaining a supply of currency and coin to meet demand in both normal times and special situations such as natural disasters, when other forms of payment might be unavailable. As a critical part of accomplishing that mission, the CPO constantly evaluates research to determine how cash use is changing in this country. One of the main sources of research is the Fed's Diary of Consumer Payment Choice (DCPC). Data collection was last fielded in 2012, but is being conducted again now. To collect the data, the DCPC asks a representative national sample of about 2,500 individuals to record all their financial transactions over a rolling three-day period. In addition to recording the transaction and demographic information, respondents were also asked to indicate their top preferred payment method and their second preferred method of payment in instances when their top choice is not available.

Some of the major findings of that study include:

  • Debit and credit cards represent the stated primary payment choice, at 64 percent, but 30 percent of the consumers stated their primary payment preference was cash.
  • Cash serves as the backup payment method for all segments, reflecting its importance in our overall payment infrastructure.
  • Interestingly, although 3 percent of the consumers said their preferred payment method was checks, they actually used cash twice as often as writing checks.
  • Reflecting the tendency for people to use cash for small-value payments, cash payments represented 40 percent of the number of payments made by the survey participants but only 14 percent of the total value of the payments.
  • Cash clearly dominates the small-value segment under $10.
  • Cash was the payment method used in two-thirds of person-to-person (P2P) payments.
  • The use of cash in P2P transactions is different from other cash transactions; P2P transactions are two-thirds higher in value ($35 versus $21) than other types of expenditures.
  • While 51 percent of the adults in the 18–34-year-old age group indicated that debit cards are their most preferred payment method, cash followed closely at 40 percent for the 18–24 year olds and 31 percent for the 25–34 age groups. Will the 2015 results show a departure from this finding?

It is clear that the United States is a long way from becoming a cashless society despite the predictions of many over the last twenty years. The 2015 results will provide important information as to how cash continues to be used by the general population and the emerging millennials segment in particular.

So is there cash in your wallet? I bet there is and will be for quite some time.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

October 19, 2015 in cards, checks, currency, payments | Permalink

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September 28, 2015


I Want My Two Dollars!

Dizziness and nausea come over me sometimes when I have to pay individuals. My mind scrambles. I don't carry cash or have checks. What grueling, lengthy steps will I have to go through to pay this person? Besides worrying about forgetting to meet my financial obligation if I don't pay right now, I find myself crossing my fingers behind my back hoping they have the same mobile app as I do. Or maybe we use the same bank, with any random luck. I picture myself as Layne Frost, the character played by John Cusack, from the movie Better Off Dead, with the paperboy at my doorstep insisting, "I want my two dollars!"

From bartering to exchanging livestock and shells, from cash and coin to checks and now mobile, it is inevitable that people will always find a way to pay and be paid. Forrester Research forecasts that the U.S. mobile peer-to-peer (P2P) market will grow to nearly $17 billion in transaction value by 2019. Yet the United States P2P payment volume by instrument is still largely cash-based, followed by check. Forecasters are planning on migration from over 6 billion cash and 2.1 billion check P2P transactions to the mobile space. Who will win the lion's share of paper-based P2P payments as people embrace electronic payments?

Let's look at the P2P payment lifecycle before you make your predictions:

P2p-payment-lifecycle

My expectation is that everyone in the P2P space today faces challenges in getting there from here. Some will have a handsome share of the market but in doing so may suffocate opportunity for ubiquitous solutions that will benefit consumers nationwide. Fragmentation is our obstacle in P2P today. If both Ps don't have something in common (for example, financial institution, phone manufacturer, mobile application, social media, branded debit card), then the payment can't occur and...back to the basics we go. Cash and checks are accepted by almost everyone. Moreover, cash eliminates the middle part—cash means finality of good funds, sender to recipient, instantly.

All P2P access channels, or funds load, providers who offer accounts to consumers—whether these providers are financial institutions; virtual wallets like Google and Paypal; mobile/online applications like SquareCash, Venmo, or Dwolla; or prepaid accounts like Bluebird or NetSpend—should be able to access a directory to process payments from anyone to anyone. Ubiquity means debit card or not, banked or unbanked, same state or not. This can be achieved when financial institutions cooperate through open access to a directory, since all nonbank P2P providers ultimately use a bank to conduct the business of processing payments.

There is an option that could surpass directory deliberations. Bitcoin's blockchain technology, like cash, can eliminate middle participants—like cash, it is finality of good funds, sender to recipient, instantly. Perhaps the directory will be technology nonpartisan and connect all payments. Until then, I'll keep crossing my fingers when the paperboy shows up.

Photo of Jessica J. Trundley By Jessica J. Trundley, AAP, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

September 28, 2015 in P2P, payments | Permalink

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June 22, 2015


The Current Tokenization Landscape in the United States

Last fall, Take on Payments featured a three-post series on tokenization. The first post introduced the technology regarding payment credentials and noted that merchant-centric tokenization solutions came to the market in the mid-2000s, driven by the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS) requiring merchants to protect cardholder data. The second post examined some of the distinguishing attributes of payment token solutions in mobile wallets that were developed to replace the payment card's primary account number (PAN) with a token so the presence of the cardholder's PAN would be minimized or eliminated in the payment's data transmissions. The final post examined the challenges of payment tokenization and discussed its effect on payment risk over the short term.

Working with the Mobile Payments Industry Workgroup (MPIW), the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston's Payments Strategies group and the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta's Retail Payment Risk Forum just released a comprehensive white paper on the current tokenization landscape in the United States. Based on our research and interviews with more than 30 payment stakeholders, the white paper provides an overview of the U.S. payment tokenization landscape for mobile and digital commerce (versus physical card payments), describes the interoperability of different tokenization systems, and examines the status of these 30 stakeholders' plans to implement to a broader audience of industry stakeholders, policymakers, and regulators.

The paper discusses the many benefits, challenges, gaps, and opportunities of tokenization from the perspectives of the major industry stakeholder groups, while acknowledging that there is not always full agreement on current approaches or underlying details. The goal in authoring this paper is to encourage further collaboration among the stakeholders to resolve differences to the mutual satisfaction of stakeholders in the industry and to provide what is best for consumers.

Tokenization in mobile payments is just a very small part of the potential impact that tokenization can have in reducing fraud in the overall payments environment, but it is a start in a payments channel that is expected to grow significantly in the years ahead. We hope that you find the paper informative and feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

June 22, 2015 in payments | Permalink

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February 23, 2015


Payments Stakeholders: Can't We All Just Work Together?

Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.
 – Henry Ford

In my physics classes at Georgia Tech, I found the principles around forces, momentum, and energy sometimes difficult to comprehend and distinguish. But I readily grasped a simplified version. I understood that if people apply their combined energy in the same direction, they can move the object of their attention to a designated spot faster and easier than if any of them tried it alone. And if they directly oppose one another or exert their efforts in different directions, the movement of the object is slow, its route is haphazard, and it may never reach its intended destination.

This last situation sometimes occurs with different groups of payments stakeholders—most notably, but not exclusively—the national card brands, along with their financial institution clients, and the merchant communities. Amidst all the charges and countercharges between the groups, it sometimes appears that these stakeholders are pushing in different directions—so the industry seems to be making little progress toward adopting payments standards and practices or fraud prevention solutions, for example.

An important payments risk issue affecting multiple stakeholders is card-not-present (CNP) fraud, which is expected to increase significantly after the United States migrates to EMV chip cards. We learned this from the experiences of other countries that have completed their migration. What happens is that EMV cards essentially close the door on the criminals' ability to create counterfeit EMV cards, so they shift focus to CNP opportunities.

Merchants contend that EMV card migration primarily benefits the card issuers since, for counterfeit-card-present (CCP) fraud, the issuer normally takes the loss—and EMV makes CCP fraud much less likely. Another way merchants may view EMV as being more issuer-friendly is that they must bear card-present fraud loss if they don't upgrade their terminals—at their expense—once the October 2015 liability shift goes into effect. So not only do they face increasing liability for card-present transactions, they will continue to be held responsible for the expected increase in CNP fraud losses.

The card brands and financial institutions counter the merchants' position on a number of fronts. For example, they point to the massive payment card data breaches that took place in 2014 at national merchants, saying these events eroded consumers' confidence in payment cards. Migrating to EMV cards and eventually replacing the magnetic stripe will provide clear improvements to payment card security, which will in turn increase consumer confidence in the safety of using cards. And that will benefit all stakeholders in this payment system. In addition, card brands and financial institutions are taking steps to help mitigate CNP fraud: they have invested heavily in several products and are collaborating with third-party providers to develop better customer authentication solutions to ultimately reduce the risk of CNP transactions for all stakeholders.

Disagreements among stakeholders will always exist, especially on elements that have a major financial impact on their businesses. However, there must be a diligent and ongoing effort by all parties, working together and with the same goal, to find areas of common ground that will result in a more secure payments environment.

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed


February 23, 2015 in cards, chip-and-pin, EMV, payments | Permalink

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February 2, 2015


Does More Security Mean More Friction in Payments?

In a 2014 post, we discussed the issue of consumers' security practices in light of the regulatory liability protection provided to consumers, especially related to electronic transactions. Recognizing that poor security practices will continue, financial institutions, merchants, and solution vendors continue to implement additional security and fraud deterrence tools in the payment flow. Sometimes those tools can add complexity to a financial transaction.

One of the critical elements in a consumer's experience when performing a financial transaction is the concept of friction. In the payments environment, friction can be measured by the number and degree of barriers that impede a smooth and successful transaction flow. Potential causes of friction in a payment transaction include lack of acceptance, slow speed, inaccuracy, high cost, numerous steps, and lack of reliability. We usually think that to decrease friction is to increase convenience.

As the level of friction increases, consumers become more likely to rethink their purchase and payment decisions—an action that merchants and financial institutions alike dread because an abandoned payment transaction represents lost revenue. Individual consumers have their preferred payment methods, and their perspective of the convenience associated with a particular method is a key factor in their choice. For this reason, the payment industry stakeholders have been working diligently to reduce the level of friction in the various forms of payments. Technology provides a number of advantages, potentially reducing the overall friction of payments by providing consumers with a variety of payment form factors. For example, smartphones can support integrated payment applications allowing the consumer to easily call up their payment credentials and execute a payment transaction at a merchant's terminal. With abandonment rates as high as 68 percent, online merchants, working diligently to reduce friction, are streamlining their checkout process by reducing the number of screens to navigate.

Clearly cognizant of the friction issue, the industry has focused much of its efforts on operating fraud risk tools in the background, so that customers remain unaware of them. Other tools are more overt—biometrics on mobile phones, hardware tokens for PCs, and transaction alerts. But some security improvements the industry has undertaken have resulted in more friction, including the EMV card. A consumer must now leave the EMV card in the terminal for the duration of the transaction when previously all the consumer had to do was simply swipe the card. It will be interesting to see if and how consumers adjust their payment habits should they view the EMV card technology as high in friction. Will this motivate consumers to move away from card-based payments? Time will tell, and we will closely follow this issue.

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed


February 2, 2015 in biometrics, chip-and-pin, EMV, innovation, payments | Permalink

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David,
You've touched upon an important continuing battle. The balancing act of maximizing conversion vs. maximizing security/fraud prevention can be a real conundrum. It impacts revenue and can even divide offices. It comes down to what your product/service is, what your appetite for risk is, and what tools you have in place. It is important though for financial institutions and ecommerce companies to seek out new technology solutions to maximize security and not be stagnant with the status quo.

Posted by: Logan | February 3, 2015 at 07:46 PM

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