Take On Payments

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Take On Payments, a blog sponsored by the Retail Payments Risk Forum of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, is intended to foster dialogue on emerging risks in retail payment systems and enhance collaborative efforts to improve risk detection and mitigation. We encourage your active participation in Take on Payments and look forward to collaborating with you.

June 20, 2016


There's an App for That!

Few would question that mobile phones have had a considerable influence in our everyday activities. They provide a level of convenience and connectivity that also generates benefits to our personal safety and the security of our banking accounts and other assets. The Pew Research Center estimates that almost two-thirds of adults in the United States own a smartphone and 15 percent use them as their primary online access device either because they do not have broadband access at their home or have few other online options.

In recent blogs, I highlighted some key findings from the Federal Reserve Board of Governors' recently released Consumers and Mobile Financial Services 2016 report. The report includes a section of questions that probe how consumers use their mobile phones in financial decision making. Within the past year, 62 percent of mobile banking users with smartphones responded that they checked their balance before they made a large purchase. The power of that information is demonstrated in that for those who checked their balance or available credit, half didn't make a purchase as a result of having that information.

Forty-five percent of smartphone owners use their phone for comparison shopping at retail stores. Forty-one percent reported they use their phones to obtain product information while shopping at retail stores, and 28 percent use a barcode scanning application for price comparisons.

Though smartphone owners value the convenience phones bring to financial decision making, security and safety are primary concerns. A little more than half of the mobile banking users take advantage of the feature of receiving some type of alert from their financial institution. The most common alert cited was for a low balance, but 36 percent reported they also receive fraud alerts.

Later this year, a number of the Federal Reserve districts, including the Sixth District, will be conducting a survey of the financial institutions in their districts about the mobile banking and mobile payments services they offer. The Sixth District participated in this effort in 2014; you can find the results here. It will be interesting to see the changes that have taken place over the last two years, especially in light of the launch of the various mobile wallets, so stay tuned.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

June 20, 2016 in banks and banking, mobile banking, mobile payments | Permalink

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June 6, 2016


Mobile Security and Privacy

In an earlier post, I provided some of the top-line findings from the Federal Reserve Board of Governors' recently released Consumers and Mobile Financial Services 2016 report. Safety and risk continue to be cited by consumers as significant barriers to their adoption of mobile banking and other new payment technology. Many consumers either don't believe that the mobile banking channel is safe or they don't understand the security features that are part of the mobile technology. The research effort probed these issues in greater detail to better understand consumer perspectives.

One of the first questions in this area asked how safe a person's personal information is when using mobile banking. As the table shows, while there has been steady positive movement over the last three years in getting many consumers to feel their personal information is safe, there remains a great challenge. A decrease of only two percentage points (42 percent in 2015 compared to a high of 44 percent in 2014) in those who believe their personal information is "somewhat unsafe" or "very unsafe" doesn't signify much advancement in the safety education efforts for these folks.

Q. How safe do you believe people's personal information is when they use mobile banking?

table-one

In a separate survey question, a slightly higher percentage of respondents (46 percent) believed that their personal information was "very unsafe" or "somewhat unsafe" when conducting a mobile point-of-service transaction at a store.

With 15 percent of the respondents indicating they "don't know," the survey illustrates the need for additional education about the security aspects of mobile banking and payment technology. The research showed that among those with mobile phones and bank accounts, mobile banking users had more confidence in the security of mobile banking transactions than non-users. Only 3 percent of mobile banking users thought that their personal information was "very unsafe" when they use mobile banking, compared to 28 percent for non-users.

When mobile phone users were probed about their specific security concerns about using their mobile phone for banking or payments, their most common response was that they were concerned about all of the listed security risks. For those who chose one specific reason, they most frequently cited fears about the phone being hacked or the data being intercepted, followed by concerns about their phone being lost or stolen.

On a positive note, consumers appear to be adopting more secure mobile phone practices. The percentage of smartphone users who password-protect their phone increased to 70 percent in 2015 from 61 percent in 2013. One-third of the smartphone owners were using antimalware software or applications to protect their phone, and a similar share used an app or service to help them locate, remotely access, erase, or disable their phone in the event it is lost or stolen.

Additionally, consumers are recognizing the need for improved authentication with their banking service provider. Seventy-four percent of smartphone owners indicated they either "strongly agree" or "agree" that they would be willing to undergo additional authentication steps when they were logging in to their mobile banking service.

Other important findings are contained in the research report, so be sure to give it a good read.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

June 6, 2016 in malware, mobile banking, mobile payments | Permalink

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May 2, 2016


Mobile Financial Services Are Still Growing

The Federal Reserve Board's Division of Consumer and Community Affairs (DCCA) recently released its Consumers and Mobile Financial Services 2016 report. This annual research effort began in 2011 to measure the adoption and usage of mobile banking and payment activities by consumers and the use of mobile technology in making financial decisions. The latest survey was fielded in November 2015 with a respondent base of 2,510 adults age 18 and over, of which 1,064 had participated in both the 2013 and 2014 surveys.

Key adoption and usage findings from the survey include:

  • The major barriers to mobile payment adoption remain the same as in previous studies—satisfaction with current methods of payment and concerns about security.
  • Convenience is the most common reason given by the respondents for adopting mobile banking.
  • Perhaps reflecting a positive effect of mobile phone security education, 70 percent of smartphone users indicated they password-protect their phone and 78 percent indicated they download applications only from their primary application store.
  • Mobile phone penetration has remained consistent over the last three years at 87 percent of the U.S. population, although smartphones now account for 77 percent of mobile phones versus 61 percent in 2013.
  • Ownership of smartphones is higher for Hispanics than for non-Hispanic whites in this survey.
  • Usage of mobile banking services by those with mobile phones increased to 43 percent from 33 percent in 2013. Smartphone owners showed a higher usage rate of mobile banking, at 53 percent, but this rate was essentially flat from 2014.
  • While usage of mobile banking has generally increased every year for each age group, younger consumers have consistently been the most likely users while the older segment has been the least likely, as the table shows:

chart-1

  • The most common mobile banking activity is checking an account balance or making a specific transaction, followed by transferring money between accounts and receiving an account alert.
  • Despite the strong usage of mobile banking, more than 80 percent of smartphone owners with a bank account visited a branch or used an ATM over the last 12 months, while only 29 percent called their banks.
  • Mobile payment activity still lags mobile banking activity. Only 24 percent of mobile phone owners had made a mobile payment over the last 12 months, compared to 43 percent of mobile phone owners with a bank account who used mobile banking. The study found that there is no clear relationship between mobile payment usage and income or education level. As in previous surveys, minorities make mobile payments at a higher rate than white, non-Hispanic consumers.

Additional findings from the survey as to security and privacy and the use of the phone in making financial decisions will be highlighted in future blogs. This survey provides valuable data in the ongoing evolution and adoption of mobile banking services and I hope you will read it in detail.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

May 2, 2016 in mobile banking, mobile payments | Permalink

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March 28, 2016


Continuing Education in Mobile Payments Security

Just over a year ago, I wrote a post raising the question of which stakeholder or stakeholders in the payments ecosystem had the responsibility for educating consumers regarding payments security. As new payment technologies such as mobile devices, wearables, and the Internet of things gain acceptance and increased usage, who is stepping up not only to teach consumers how to use the devices but also how to do so in a safe and secure manner?

Since it is generally financial institutions that have the greatest financial risk for payment transactions because of the protective liability legislation that exists in the United States, this responsibility has fallen largely to them. However, this educational effort has become increasingly difficult since consumers generally acquire these new products at retail outlets or mobile carrier stores, where the financial institution has no direct contact with the consumer.

The Consumer Federation of America (CFA) recently continued its ongoing efforts to provide educational information to consumers with the release of a guide to mobile payments. The guide is comprehensive, covering issues such as privacy, security of the mobile device, the dangers of malware, error resolution, and dispute procedures for mobile payments, and concludes with a humorous animated video that recaps some of the risks with mobile phones if they are not secured and used properly.

As an example, in its section on privacy, the guide offers the following tips:

  • Read the privacy policies of the companies whose services you are using to make mobile payments and the companies that you are paying.
  • If you don't like a company's privacy policy, take your business elsewhere.
  • Don't voluntarily provide information that is not necessary to use a product or service or make a payment.
  • Take advantage of the controls that you may be given over the collection and use of your personal information.
  • Since mobile payments, like all electronic payments, leave a trail, if there are transactions that you would prefer to make anonymously, pay with cash.

Kudos to the CFA for its work on this effort. I hope you will read the guide and spread the word about the availability of this valuable resource. It is through the combined efforts of the payments stakeholders that we can work to improve the knowledge level of all parties involved and promote secure usage.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

March 28, 2016 in consumer protection, innovation, mobile banking, mobile payments | Permalink

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February 22, 2016


2016 Payment Predictions

In our 2015 year-end review, we promised we would provide some predictions and expectations for payments in the United States during 2016. Predictions are usually pretty…unpredictable, so by waiting a couple of months to release ours, we're hoping they will end up being more accurate than usual. Disclaimer: These predictions are through the collective wisdom of the Retail Payments Risk Forum staff and do not reflect the opinions of the Federal Reserve System or the Board of Governors. So here we go in no particular order or probability of happening.

  • Cyberattacks will be the top threat to payments security: Cyberattacks and data breaches will be as robust as ever and will be the number one threat in the payments ecosystem. As retailers and financial service companies strengthen their defenses, the Risk Forum predicts that hackers will widen their focus.
  • This will be the year for mobile point-of-service (POS) payments…not!: Like the broken analog clock face that is correct twice a day, we believe that those forecasting 2016 as the "year of mobile payments" (as they did in 2013, 2014, and 2015) will be a little bit right, but will still be waiting for this optimistic prediction to be fully true. While the adoption pace of mobile payments is growing because of the increasing influence of millennials, the issues of limited merchant acceptance points, fragmentation, and consumer concerns over security and privacy will remain as substantial hurdles. Major educational efforts will be launched stressing the increased security provided by mobile payments through tokenization and biometrics.
  • EMV (chip card) POS migration will pick up the pace from 2015: The liability shift for POS took place October 1, 2015, and projections for both card and terminal capability missed their optimistic marks for a variety of reasons. Credit and debit card reissuance will continue during 2016 and should reach significant conversion levels by the end of the year. The Risk Forum expects the pace of merchant terminal conversions to pick up as certifications are completed and merchants targeted by counterfeit card fraudsters feel the sting of losses. However, we also think some merchant categories, such as restaurants, will continue to proceed at a tepid pace.
  • ACH same-day service will not be a huge hit: The Risk Forum forecasts that the roll-out of NACHA's mandated same-day ACH service in September will, at least initially, have modest adoption because corporate originators will have to update internal systems to support faster payments, the dollar cap of $25,000 per payment, and the imposition of the interbank fee. Consumer payment applications will have modest uptake due to competing payment alternatives.
  • EMV ATM liability shift will cause the number of ATMs to shrink: The implementation of chip card readers in ATMs will follow the same pattern as POS terminals did in 2015—the large ATM owners and operators will meet the October 2016 deadline but many of the small and mid-sized operators, especially those owned by nonfinancial institutions, will not and will be faced with absorbing the loss of transactions made with counterfeit cards—a fraud loss they haven't experienced in the past. Overall, the Risk Forum looks for the ATM base in the U.S. to contract by 10 to 15 percent because of financial institution mergers and the cost of EMV upgrades.
  • Mobile wallet space will continue to see turbulence: 2015 saw the launch or announcement of more mobile wallets by payment stakeholders such as Samsung, Google, Chase, Capital One, Walmart, and Target. Then add the retailer and credit union consortiums (MCX CurrentC and CU Wallet) that are struggling to emerge from uncertainty. How many wallets will the consumer be willing to load on a phone and which providers do they trust to keep their payments and banking credentials safe? We believe we'll see continued turbulence in this space during 2016, with some settling of the dust by next year.
  • Blockchain technology interest will accelerate: Cryptocurrencies will continue to exist in the "novelty" space, but we think large payments players will direct efforts to leveraging the distributed ledger technology for various uses and will proceed at an accelerated pace.
  • Biometric technology improves, but passwords remain supreme: Despite continued cries for intervention, the user ID and password will remain the primary authentication method that consumers use to access their various applications. Biometrics technology for payment and customer authentication applications will continue to improve while decreasing in price. Fingerprint, facial recognition, and eye/iris recognition will dominate as the most-used biometrics although voice recognition will serve as a key method in certain environments such as call centers. The Risk Forum believes that the technology will continue to face critical adoption challenges due to concerns about privacy, security, and safety, but educational programs will lower this resistance.
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Mary Kepler
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Steven Cordray
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Doug King
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Dave Lott
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Jessica Trundley
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Julius Weyman

February 22, 2016 in cybercrime, data security, EMV, mobile payments | Permalink

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February 16, 2016


Changing How We Pay Online in 2016

Over the past few years, I've done the majority of my Christmas shopping online through my laptop or mobile device. This year, I did 100 percent of my shopping online due to an accident that left me mostly immobile. Though shopping online was certainly easier for me than trying to get out in the hustle and bustle of the December shopping madness, the payment experience for some of my transactions was as painful as my leg injury.

I have been hearing for years how the mobile phone is going to replace my wallet, and one reason is that our phones are increasingly with us while our wallets are not. Yet I never leave my house or office without my wallet unless I forget it. In fact, I forget my mobile phone more often than my wallet, but apparently I'm an exception. However, I realized that when I'm home, I am rarely with my wallet. Out of habit, I leave my wallet sitting on a shelf in the closet. This habit never created issues for me until recently.

Except for websites that have my card on file, I am almost always required to enter my card information (account number, expiration date, and maybe the card security code). The expiration or CVV2 are still required even for some of my card-on-file transactions. While it's always been something of a hassle to go get my card information from my closet, I never gave much thought to the friction of the experience—that is, until my left leg was temporarily rendered useless and making it to my wallet in the closet became difficult. When my wife wasn't around to get my wallet, my cart abandonment rate pushed 100 percent.

Then I discovered how easy it is to use online digital wallets. And I tried a lot of them—PayPal, American Express Checkout (actually more of a platform than a wallet), Visa Checkout, and MasterCard's MasterPass, to name a few. While each wallet has its pros and cons and merchant acceptance varies by wallet, I gained a greater appreciation for these transactions because of how easy it was not needing to physically have my card to enter the requested information for each transaction beyond the initial wallet setup. And I liked not having my card on file with a merchant. By the end of the shopping season, I had become a big fan of digital wallets.

Removing friction from the consumer experience is just one reason why many believe that mobile proximity payments will flourish. I never agreed with that reason (this was in a pre-EMV world though!) but it is a big reason why I believe online commerce will experience a significant transformation in 2016 with both merchant and consumer adoption of digital wallets taking off this year.

By Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

February 16, 2016 in mobile banking, mobile payments | Permalink

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January 19, 2016


Mobile Wallets: Is This the Year?

In our 2015 year-end retrospective post, we commented on the slow pace of adoption of mobile payments despite the introduction of several major mobile wallets. While some consumer research continues to point to widespread consumer usage of mobile wallets in the coming years, we have seen similar projections from past research fail to materialize.

So what have been the major barriers to adopting mobile wallets? And for those who have adopted them, what functions are the most important? As I have noted before, I am a firm believer in former Intel CEO Andrew Grove's 10X rule: a new technology experience must be at least 10 times better than the previous method to achieve widespread consumer adoption and usage. A number of different elements—speed, cost, convenience, personalized experience, ease of use, and so on—can all contribute to achieve that 10X factor. Another critical element is the consumer's trust in the security of the wallet to ensure that payment credentials and transaction information will not be compromised in some way. The market research and strategy firm Chadwick Martin Bailey (CMB) conducted mobile wallet research in March–April 2015 on a nationally representative sample of smartphone owners and specifically asked mobile wallet nonusers what were their particular security concerns. As the chart shows, identity theft and the interception of personal information during the transaction were the top two reasons given.

Chart-1

The tokenization of payment credentials goes a long way to providing a higher level of security, but a major educational effort is required to relay this knowledge to consumers to increase their level of confidence. The CMB study found that 58 percent of nonusers would be somewhat or extremely likely to use a wallet if tokenization of their payment account information were performed.

But is it enough to convince consumers that mobile payments are more secure to significantly speed up adoption and usage? Mobile wallet proponents have been saying for years that the mobile wallet must deliver more than just a payment function, that it should include incorporate loyalty, couponing, identification, or other functions.

So if the desired end state is known, why is it taking so long for the mobile wallet providers to achieve that winning solution? The retailer consortium MCX is going into its fourth year of development and has just recently begun a pilot program of its CurrentC wallet in the Columbus, Ohio, market. Two of MCX's owners and major U.S. retailers, Walmart and Target, have announced in the last couple of months their plans to develop and operate their own mobile wallet. While these companies still profess their support of the MCX program, have they concluded that a common mobile wallet solution among competing retailers doesn't meet all their specific needs? Or is it a desire to offer their customers a wider choice of shopping experience options and differentiate their experience? Or is it another reason altogether? Only time will tell.

So do you believe that 2016 will be the year of the mobile wallet? Let us know what you think.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

January 19, 2016 in consumer fraud, contactless, identity theft, mobile payments | Permalink

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January 4, 2016


The Year In Review

2015 marked the end of the era for my favorite late-night talk show host. In his 33 years of bringing laughter to late-night audiences, David Letterman is perhaps best known for his nightly Top 10 list. During the last several years, the Risk Forum's last blog for the year has included our own list of top 10 payments events. Our efforts clearly didn't match Letterman's entertaining Top 10s, and we have decided to retire our Top 10 blog in favor of a year-end review blog.

2015 can easily be characterized as "The Year of Deals." We witnessed two established payment processors, Worldpay and First Data, become publicly traded entities, with IPOs during the year. Following these IPOs, Square became the first "Unicorn"—a tech start-up with a valuation in excess of $1 billion—to test the public markets with its IPO. Beyond the IPOs, there were ample other noteworthy deals in 2015, including Ebay spinning off PayPal as its own entity; Visa acquiring its former subsidiary, Visa Europe; Global Payments' acquisition of Heartland; and a host of mergers such as the one between Early Warning and ClearXchange. On the venture capital and private equity side, indications suggest that 2015 will top 2014's nearly $10 billion investment in financial technology in the United States with payments-related investments leading the way.

Near and dear to the Risk Forum, notable risk-related stories will also make 2015 memorable. The long-anticipated initial EMV liability shift took place on October 1 with mixed reviews from different participants in the payments ecosystem. Data breaches that included the compromise of payment credentials and personally identifiable information seemed to be an almost-weekly event during the year. In response to the increasing incidence of data breaches and anticipated increase in card-not-present fraud, the buzz surrounding tokenization, which began in earnest with the launch of Apple Pay in 2014, intensified within the payments industry.

Mobile proximity payments might be the most frequent payment topic over the past five years, and 2015 was no different. While many have labeled each year over the last five as the "Year of Mobile Payments," mobile still has a way to go before the Risk Forum is willing to give this title to any year, including 2015. However, momentum for mobile proximity payments remained positive with the launch of Apple Pay rivals Samsung Pay and Android Pay. We witnessed a well-known and early established mobile wallet, SoftCard (originally branded as Isis), exit the playing field after being acquired by Google. The Merchant Customer Exchange (MCX), a consortium of retailers, launched a pilot of its mobile wallet—CurrentC—and has also partnered with Chase and its Chase Pay service with entrée to 94 million cards; and two large Financial Institutions, Chase and Capital One, both announced new mobile wallet initiatives. In December, Walmart and Target announced their own mobile payment applications. While mobile proximity payment usage remains minimal, it is becoming increasingly clear that consumers are using their mobile phones to shop online. According to holiday shopping figures from Black Friday through Cyber Monday 2015, mobile shopping accounted for approximately one-third of total e-commerce sales.

Finally, in 2015, the payment industry witnessed the launch of a comprehensive, collaborative effort to improve the speed and security of payments in the United States. In January, the Federal Reserve issued its long-anticipated Strategies for Improving the U.S. Payment System followed by the formation of two task forces, Faster Payments and Secure Payments, seeking to turn these strategies into actionable payment improvements. Related to improving the speed of payments, NACHA membership approved a same-day ACH service after a similar measure failed to gain approval in 2012.

As those in the payments industry have come to expect excitement and innovation, 2015 did not disappoint. And while it's certainly fun to look back, we must always keep looking ahead. Perhaps the most famous late-night talk show host, Johnny Carson, understood this best with his beloved great seer, soothsayer, and sage Carnac the Magnificent persona. Be on the lookout for our upcoming blog where the Risk Forum will channel our inner Carnac with some predictions and expectations for payments in 2016.

By the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

January 4, 2016 in cybercrime, data security, mobile payments, payments study | Permalink

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August 31, 2015


A Swing and a Miss

"Keep your eyes on the ball." I'm guessing my son heard those words at least 20 times a game this past baseball season. If you can't follow the ball, then your chances of a successful plate appearance are pretty slim.

Departing from the usual risk-related prose and taking a signal from the blog's name Take On Payments, I want to offer my thoughts on mobile payments. This topic floods my payments news feeds and is the subject du jour at nearly every payments-related event. Mobile payments can mean many things to many people, but one of the hottest areas is mobile at the point of sale (POS), also known as proximity payments—that is, what Apple Pay, Starbucks, and Samsung Pay among others all offer.

And this is where I think the payments industry is taking its eyes off the ball. Why do consumers want to use mobile phones to replace cash or cards at the POS? A key barrier cited by consumers who have not adopted mobile proximity payments is their satisfaction with current payment methods. So what is the best way to get consumers to use their mobile devices to replace cash or cards at the POS?

The mobile phone has significantly changed the way people interact. It's almost comical to me that the device has retained the word phone. While there will always be people who want to hear a voice or interact directly with another person, the mobile device is turning us into a society that prefers messaging over speaking and interacting through the device rather than face to face. (My nieces text each other while sitting in the same room!) Furthermore, we have come to expect information to be readily available to us whenever and wherever we desire it. People don't like waiting, and the mobile device has intensified this impatience. To understand consumer behavior in light of this mobile revolution, we don't have to look any further than the reduction of bank branches and staffing coupled with the rise of mobile banking solutions.

Yet the proximity payment solutions don't address consumer behavior with their mobile devices. I understand merchants valuing the ability of proximity payments to provide loyalty programs and targeted offers, but do these extra services really address consumers' core needs and wants? It seems to have worked for Starbucks in a closed-loop environment but has yet to be replicated in an open-loop environment. (Closed loop means that the payment is usable only at a provider's place of business, as for the Starbucks app. Open loop means the payment, like Apple Pay, is usable anywhere that has the infrastructure to read the app.)

By keeping the focus on the consumer, it seems to me that the mobile payments industry can work on reducing the physical interaction of payments and current wait times associated with the payment process. Uber, Chipotle, and the Starbucks mobile app are evolving to address these consumer needs. These apps essentially remove the payment from the POS (some would say that they make the payment invisible) and allow for minimal personal interaction and waiting times.

Hence, I predict the growth of mobile payments will come not from the POS but rather through mobile in-app payments. That's where I'd be setting my sights on the mobile payments diamond. Perhaps this will create a healthy discussion (hopefully not a bench-clearing brawl), but I think mobile at the POS is a swing and a miss. What do you think?

Photo of Douglas A. King By Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed


August 31, 2015 in innovation, mobile payments | Permalink

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July 6, 2015


Growing, Growing, Gone!

As we've blogged before, check writing has been steadily declining as electronic payments have grown. For example, the number of checks written in 2012 was 21 billion, down from 27.8 billion in 2009, according to the 2013 Federal Reserve Payments Study. We may be writing fewer checks than ever, but more than anything, we want the convenience of depositing our checks with mobile devices. A 2013 survey by ath Power Consulting found that mobile remote deposit capture (mRDC) is the "most sought-after mobile banking feature" among consumers. And financial institutions are answering this demand. According to 2014 surveys from Federal Reserve Banks (the Dallas Fed's, for example), about 48 percent of responding institutions are currently offering mobile capture and another 41 percent are planning to offer it within the next two years.

With mRDC in such demand, solutions providers and financial institutions should be investing in risk management strategies. But if check writing is a declining business, will mRDC risk management investments end up on the disabled list? Financial institutions must look at the potential losses and how they occur, evaluate the means to minimize these, and carefully weigh these factors against the dwindling check industry.

The mRDC channel faces two primary loss challenges: fraudulent items and duplicate check presentment. A fraudulent item might be an altered, forged, or counterfeit check; it can also be an intentional duplicate presentment. The other challenge occurs when a customer unintentionally presents a deposited item a second time. Research and anecdotal evidence suggest many duplicate presentments result from customer errors. These represent a growing customer education need. Financial institutions must find room in the allocated lineup and spending cap for fraud and duplicate detection enhancements.

Handling duplicate check presentments landed an all-star position on the agenda at most payments operation conferences this past year. Duplicate check presentments mean returns and adjustments, which in turn mean time and money for the financial institutions. When duplicate presentment involves more than one bank of first deposit, losses are often sustained from misunderstanding holder-in-due-course rights and return-versus-adjustment processes. Financial institutions often need to reconstruct what happened, analyze the facts, and possibly consult legal counsel.

But rather than handling these risks with expensive roster moves, considering the declining use of checks, financial institutions can meet the threat at the origin, through customer education and enforcement policies. Financial institutions that offer mRDC can make disclosed stipulations. For example, they can require that the original check be destroyed after confirmation, or that checks have a specific restrictive endorsement that includes "for mobile deposit only." Ultimately, if a consumer deposits a check twice, financial institutions can charge a fee or suspend service. In general, customers want to avoid fines, so they tend to play within the rules when fines are looming. If training customers is a home run in mitigation, then the grand slam is having detection systems that support the stipulations and rules put into place.

Photo of Douglas A. King By Jessica J. Trundley, AAP, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

July 6, 2015 in checks, consumer protection, mobile banking, mobile payments | Permalink

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