Take On Payments

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Take On Payments, a blog sponsored by the Retail Payments Risk Forum of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, is intended to foster dialogue on emerging risks in retail payment systems and enhance collaborative efforts to improve risk detection and mitigation. We encourage your active participation in Take on Payments and look forward to collaborating with you.

August 31, 2015


A Swing and a Miss

"Keep your eyes on the ball." I'm guessing my son heard those words at least 20 times a game this past baseball season. If you can't follow the ball, then your chances of a successful plate appearance are pretty slim.

Departing from the usual risk-related prose and taking a signal from the blog's name Take On Payments, I want to offer my thoughts on mobile payments. This topic floods my payments news feeds and is the subject du jour at nearly every payments-related event. Mobile payments can mean many things to many people, but one of the hottest areas is mobile at the point of sale (POS), also known as proximity payments—that is, what Apple Pay, Starbucks, and Samsung Pay among others all offer.

And this is where I think the payments industry is taking its eyes off the ball. Why do consumers want to use mobile phones to replace cash or cards at the POS? A key barrier cited by consumers who have not adopted mobile proximity payments is their satisfaction with current payment methods. So what is the best way to get consumers to use their mobile devices to replace cash or cards at the POS?

The mobile phone has significantly changed the way people interact. It's almost comical to me that the device has retained the word phone. While there will always be people who want to hear a voice or interact directly with another person, the mobile device is turning us into a society that prefers messaging over speaking and interacting through the device rather than face to face. (My nieces text each other while sitting in the same room!) Furthermore, we have come to expect information to be readily available to us whenever and wherever we desire it. People don't like waiting, and the mobile device has intensified this impatience. To understand consumer behavior in light of this mobile revolution, we don't have to look any further than the reduction of bank branches and staffing coupled with the rise of mobile banking solutions.

Yet the proximity payment solutions don't address consumer behavior with their mobile devices. I understand merchants valuing the ability of proximity payments to provide loyalty programs and targeted offers, but do these extra services really address consumers' core needs and wants? It seems to have worked for Starbucks in a closed-loop environment but has yet to be replicated in an open-loop environment. (Closed loop means that the payment is usable only at a provider's place of business, as for the Starbucks app. Open loop means the payment, like Apple Pay, is usable anywhere that has the infrastructure to read the app.)

By keeping the focus on the consumer, it seems to me that the mobile payments industry can work on reducing the physical interaction of payments and current wait times associated with the payment process. Uber, Chipotle, and the Starbucks mobile app are evolving to address these consumer needs. These apps essentially remove the payment from the POS (some would say that they make the payment invisible) and allow for minimal personal interaction and waiting times.

Hence, I predict the growth of mobile payments will come not from the POS but rather through mobile in-app payments. That's where I'd be setting my sights on the mobile payments diamond. Perhaps this will create a healthy discussion (hopefully not a bench-clearing brawl), but I think mobile at the POS is a swing and a miss. What do you think?

Photo of Douglas A. King By Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed


August 31, 2015 in innovation, mobile payments | Permalink

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August 17, 2015


Pigskin and Payments

For those who know me well, they know that I find August to be the slowest-moving month of the year. It's not because of the oppressive southern heat and humidity, but rather it's my anticipation for football season. To help speed along the "dog days of summer," I generally read my fair share of prognostication publications. Alongside the predictions, improving player safety has become a key discussion topic as the season approaches.

Armed with data showing an increase in injuries as well as long-term negative effects from playing the sport, football's governing bodies on both the collegiate and professional levels are instituting rule changes to make the game safer. Equipment manufacturers are introducing new gear to improve safety and individual teams are adding new experts to their medical staffs all in the name of player safety.

Ironically, while there is a focus on improving player safety, football players continue to get stronger and faster aided by advancements in nutrition and workout regimes. As player strength and speed improves, this contact sport becomes more vicious and dangerous. And as a fan, I'll admit that I find watching a game featuring stronger and faster players more exciting. I do not want to see players injured, but at the same time I enjoy the excitement that comes with hard tackles and big hits.

Does this state of football sound at all like the current state of the U.S. payments industry? To make payments safer, public and private entities are leading literally hundreds of initiatives across various payments rails. Network rule changes are taking place and new technologies are being harnessed all in an effort to better secure payments. At the same time, start-ups, established payment companies, payment associations, and the Federal Reserve are collaborating to improve the speed of payments.

It's hard not to get excited about the possibilities of faster payments, from important just-in-time supplier payments to simple repayments for borrowing money from a friend or family member. However, can securing payments better derail the speed of payments? By way of example and personal experience, my more secure EMV (chip) credit card has clearly reduced the speed at the point-of-sale for my card payment transactions.

But just as player strength and speed has evolved alongside safety through rule-making and technology (think about leather football helmets here), I think we have seen the same progression within the payments industry. I think football remains as exciting as ever, and the payments expert in me is clearly excited about the future of payments.

Speed and safety are not to be viewed as mutually exclusive, and I am confident that the payments industry supports this view. In both football and payments, elements of risk will exist, regardless of safety measures in place. Finding the right balance between speed and safety should be the goal in order to maintain an exciting football game or efficient payments system. I can't wait to see what lies ahead on the gridiron and within the payments industry.

Photo of Douglas A. King By Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

August 17, 2015 in emerging payments, EMV, fraud, innovation, risk management | Permalink

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August 10, 2015


Payments at the Speed of Electricity--What Could Go Wrong?

From mobile phones to the Internet—it's hard to think of many of today's great inventions that aren't beholden to the wonder of electricity and the pace at which it can facilitate the management and movement of data. Electricity has underpinned numerous payment advances already. Now, harnessed current promises to help us build a payments scheme that will make it possible to pay (and be paid) almost as fast as one can conceive of the need. That happy thought might cause us to forget this otherwise widely known truth: electricity is just as efficient in yielding a bad outcome as it is in bringing about a good one.

Those who have begun work to design a faster payment scheme will obviously be thoughtful about everything, from functional design and basic operation to ongoing management of the new system. Giving due consideration to what could go wrong may not be the most glamorous task, but it's necessary.

One way to identify potential problems is to reflect on lessons from the past. Look at the photograph below and see if you know what's depicted.

American-bank
Source: Wikimedia Commons

If you guessed the photo shows a bank run, congratulations. As most of us know, rapid, heavy cash withdrawals constitute a bank run and can be caused by a variety of things, including diminished confidence in a bank, in the banking system broadly, or the local economy, among other things.

Back to faster payments. A faster payment platform offers many upsides, but for all its promise, it could also offer the unexpected, the unintended. Circa 1929, when the picture was taken, making a run on a bank meant standing in line and waiting for a teller to retrieve your money. Circa 2015, even with ATMs and other improvements, bank runs still have some natural choke points, including weekends, when customers know with certainty that their bank is closed for at least one day, and limits on ATM withdrawal amounts in a 24-hour period. A fast, 24/7, universally accessible system could offer depositors a way to drain cash reserves like never before.

What to do? Setting aside broader systemic actions, it seems reasonable that individual banks consider measures to guard against this possibility. To deal with runs in the "old days," withdrawals were limited or even fully suspended for a time. These mitigations could be efficiently, readily mimicked and become part of the new system's basic construct. Automated tools capping withdrawal amounts might be in order. Logic in the core platform that considers the full range of activity across institutions and accounts and that allows for automated or manual controls (or a combination of these) may also make sense. Tailored rules could prove worthwhile.

The considerations should be fulsome—across not just this, but a range of issues—among those who may design, build, and operate the system and also those who may use it. Meanwhile, here's to anticipating a new system that moves money as fast as electricity allows, insulated from shocks.

Photo of Julius Weyman By Julius Weyman, vice president, Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

August 10, 2015 in innovation | Permalink

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July 20, 2015


Unsafe at Any Speed?

If you're a Corvair enthusiast, you likely get the title's reference to Ralph Nader's book that polemically accused manufacturers of resistance to the advancement of automotive safety. Shift your thoughts from automobiles, axles, and bumpers to payments, cyberattacks and data breaches. Then consider this question—if we successfully speed up payments, is payment safety more likely to advance or retreat?

I hear the question often. Since I first blogged about this topic in January, I've attended several conferences set in the context of building a better, faster, more efficient payments system. If the conversation hasn't gone straight to "safety," the topic has surely been broached before closing. The answers that presenters offer, in terms of how we make payments more secure, remain unchanged from earlier this year. The updated summary follows.

  • Innovate. Make full use of such things as biometrics and tokenization. Do not fear but rather make use of the best things coming from the cryptocurrency world.
  • Collaborate and coordinate. Share everything, taking full advantage of groups of all types to facilitate deployment and spread of best practices, among other things.
  • Prevent and plan. In a continuous and ever-improving activity, make use of such things as enhanced threat detection and continue to layer security measures. Also, educate fully, across the spectrum of both providers and users.
  • Track and report. We must do more of this in a frank, transparent way and it must be timelier.

Emphasizing and pursuing all these goals is still right in my view, yet something seems missing. I believe what's missing is a more expansive, easily accessible law enforcement regime—something that more closely parallels what's available for conventional crime fighting.

There has been good news, of late, in that various law enforcement agencies have both apprehended and successfully prosecuted cybercriminals of all sorts. What's important about this is, as law enforcement has more success, there is hope that miscreants will have an increasing expectation of getting caught. Let's assume a drop in crime rates is highly correlated to the likelihood or certainty of being caught. Self-test the theory by thinking of it this way. How often do you exceed the speed limit (answer silently to yourself). Now consider—how often do you speed when a patrol car is in the lane right next to you? It's imperative that law enforcement continue to evolve and improve such that the criminals who contemplate cybercrime increasingly anticipate they'll be caught.

The cliché that faster payments will mean faster fraud if we don't have faster security is somewhat beside the point. The fact is cybercrime has been and remains a material and looming threat. The world is all but fully a digital one and that means our police have to be able to put more—and more effective—digital patrol cars on the digital highway. Until then, to varying extents, payments are likely to be unsafe—at any speed.

Photo of Julius Weyman By Julius Weyman, vice president, Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

July 20, 2015 in crime, cybercrime, innovation, law enforcement, payments risk | Permalink

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June 29, 2015


The More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same

As I write this blog on the screened porch of a North Alabama lake house, the cicadas are constantly buzzing in the background. I am fascinated by the life cycle of this species—namely, the emergence of the periodical cicadas from belowground every 13 to 17 years. This life cycle got me thinking how the world has changed since the last time the 17-year cicadas emerged. And while in this neck of the woods, some things have changed—new houses have been built and personal watercraft are now constantly buzzing on the lake—some things have remained the same. The nearest grocery store is still 30 minutes away and the iced tea is as sweet as it ever was. Is this mixed scenario really any different for payment card fraud?

Certainly a lot has changed in card payments during the last 17 or so years. We've witnessed the enormous growth of debit card transactions, the continued growth of credit card transactions, the emergence of the e-commerce and mobile payments channels, and the almost global adoption of the EMV (chip) card. As card payment usage has evolved, so has the fraud landscape. Lost and stolen card fraud fell out of vogue while counterfeit card fraud took off only to see stolen card fraud re-emerge when the issuance of EMV cards in most markets thwarted counterfeit card fraud. Point-of-sale (POS) fraud is occurring less often across the globe because of EMV and PIN verification, driving the fraudsters to the Internet to commit card-not-present (CNP) fraud.

But what hasn't changed is the global rate of fraud. An article in the August 2013 Nilson Report estimated that the annual cost of card fraud worldwide in 2012 was 5.2 cents for every $100 spent, resulting in $11.27 billion in losses. This figure compares to Nilson's estimate of fraud losses in 1998, which ran approximately 4.8 cents for every $100 spent and resulted in a little less than $2 billion of fraud. Perhaps a fraud rate in the 5 basis points range is the industry-wide acceptable rate, but with billions of dollars being invested to mitigate fraud, I would like to think that over time the rate would be reduced (though I must admit that I am not sure what the acceptable rate should be).

Maybe this speaks to the tenacity of the card fraudsters. As we in the Retail Payments Risk Forum have often stressed, once one door is fortified, the fraudsters find another door to enter. And if we could dive deeper within the figures, I am certain that is what we would find, according to various estimates of fraud and anecdotal evidence. For example, the emergence of EMV and the use of PIN verification instead of signature verification have reduced POS fraud. Today, CNP fraud rates are significantly higher than POS fraud rates and many industry risk efforts are focused on mitigating CNP fraud.

When the cicadas reappear, undoubtedly the payment card usage and fraud landscape will look different. Perhaps mobile payments will have taken off and the use of biometrics as a method of verification will be commonplace. I feel confident that in 17 years the industry will make substantial strides in reducing e-commerce CNP fraud rates—but also that new areas of fraud will appear. Is the industry prepared to fight the next generation of fraud or will it just continue to Band-Aid the past? Should we expect a 5 basis points rate of fraud when the cicadas emerge in another 17 years? I'd like to think the rate will be lower. At a minimum, hopefully, it will remain as consistent as the sweet iced tea in this neck of the woods.

Photo of Douglas A. King By Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed


June 29, 2015 in cards, chip-and-pin, EMV, fraud, innovation, mobile payments | Permalink

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June 15, 2015


“Customer, You Have the Conn”

Sometimes when you're watching nautical-themed movies, you'll hear the phrase, "I have the conn." The person who speaks this phrase is alerting all those on the vessel that he or she is in control with regard to the vessel's direction and speed. Customers could utter that phrase with regard to their payment vessels—they pretty much have full control in that they make the final choices about their method of payment. They may be restricted by the payment options a merchant offers, but in most cases, if they don't like the options they can shop, or secure services elsewhere.

One of the challenges with payment security that we frequently mention in our posts and speaking engagements is the disincentive that various consumer protection regulations give for consumers to adopt strong security practices. We have all seen or heard of the consumers who write their PINs on their debit cards or set up the PIN 1-2-3-4. In addition, research consistently tells us that consumers often select easily guessed user IDs and passwords—and then often use those same ID/password combinations on multiple sites.

Financial institutions and other payment stakeholders have long worked to develop tools that will encourage customers to be more aware of their financial account activity and contribute to minimizing fraud losses. Account alerts are among the most useful and popular of the tools. When consumers set up account alerts, they can usually specify conditions that will trigger a text message or e-mail. Common alerts are sent when the account balance drops below a set threshold, a debit transaction posts in excess of a specified amount, or an address or phone number change was made on the account. These alerts are beneficial, but they are merely reactive; they report only when a condition has already occurred.

I believe we will soon see a major breakthrough in card security. There are new applications now in testing or in early roll-out phases. These applications will allow customers to be proactive because they will be able to set up a number of filters or controls on their payment cards that will dictate whether a transaction even gets to the point for an authorization decision. For example, if I have a payment card that I use only for gasoline purchases, I can designate my settings to reject transactions coming from other merchant categories. Or I can specify that no international transactions should be allowed. At the extreme end of the control options, I can "turn off" my card, thereby blocking all transactions, and then I can turn it back on when I am ready to use it again. The possible options and filters are almost limitless for this self-service function. Yes, there will be the need for strong customer education, and the choices will require a reasonable limit or the customer will never remember what they set.

If these options are enabled and cardholders are then willing to "take the conn," this new tool could help significantly reduce the number of unauthorized transactions. Critical to the success is whether cardholders will set a reasonable range of parameters based on their normal card usage patterns so they don't get transactions rejected they actually make themselves but still be able to weed out the truly unauthorized transactions. I say "full speed ahead" with such tools. What do you say?

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

June 15, 2015 in consumer protection, data security, innovation | Permalink

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June 01, 2015


Follow the Money

This blog is inspired by Jack Weatherford's The History of Money, and I'll open with a quote from the book's introduction, attributed to Gertrude Stein: "The thing that differentiates man from animals is money." Now I'm guessing most of us can think of a few more distinctions than that, but I will wager her item would make just about any top ten list.

In his book, Mr. Weatherford discusses three generations of money, noting that today's free market systems saw their genesis in Lydia several millennia ago with the advent of coins. He credits the invention not only with leading to our free market systems but also with destroying "the great tributary empires of history." In other words, money can build new, mighty things and fell that which was once mighty.

Mr. Weatherford describes the second generation of money as beginning in Italy with the Renaissance and moving through the Industrial Revolution. What emerged in this turning was paper money and banking and what fell was feudalism, "changing the basis of organization from heredity to money," with ownership of land supplanted by ownership of stocks, bonds, and the like. In other words, modern capitalism took hold and society evolved into something very different from what it had been.

He describes stage three as electronic money and the virtual economy. Instantly, we recognize the current age. In the way he presents the history, he makes a compelling case that noteworthy evolution and reinvention of money changes the world.

"Fascinating," you might say, "but so what?" Before suggesting an answer, I point out that Mr. Weatherford published this work in 1997. Nevertheless, presciently, he said, "A new struggle is beginning for the control of [money]... We are likely to see a prolonged era of competition during which many kinds of money will appear, proliferate, and disappear in rapidly crashing waves. In the quest to control the new money [emphasis mine], many contenders are struggling to become the primary money institution of the new era."

Indeed. So, I get to my answer. At the moment, one of the focal points for many payment wonks is making platforms "faster." A lot has gone into that already, and much more seems yet to come. A key risk if not the chief risk in this endeavor is ending up with an industry focus that is too narrow (platforms only). It could cause key payment participants to end up missing an important change—in money—not the mechanisms for moving it.

As work progresses to reach consensus on what and how to improve the extant payment mechanism, it seems good to pause and make sure the focus. Pursuit of a purely faster mechanism that envisions world monetary systems continuing to be based on the things they've been based on for centuries now could cause us to overlook or miss the next evolution of money. It would have been of little use to invest in improving the systems for speeding the exchange of cowrie shells as the turn was made toward paper money and banking. I think that to get this right, it is important to worry less about improving the system(s) for facilitating exchange, and more about what's going to be exchanged.

Photo of Julius Weyman By Julius Weyman, vice president, Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

June 1, 2015 in emerging payments, innovation | Permalink

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Excellent observation and well stated.

Posted by: Kimberly Rector | June 05, 2015 at 10:11 AM

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May 04, 2015


Keeping Up with the Criminals: Improving Customer Authentication

The interesting thing about authenticating customers for checks and PIN-based debit transactions is that the customer's authentication credentials are within the transaction media themselves—a signature, a PIN. But for the rest of the transaction types, authentication is more difficult. The payments industry has responded to this challenge in a few different ways, and may be turning increasingly to the use of biometrics—that is, the use of physical and behavioral characteristics to validate a person's identity.

Improving customer authentication in the payments industry has been a focal point for the Retail Payments Risk Forum since its formation. After all, authenticating the parties in a payment transaction efficiently and with a high level of confidence is critical to the ongoing safety and soundness of the U.S. payments system. We have intensified our focus over the last two years, including holding a forum on the topic in mid-2013. The Forum has also just released a working paper that explores the challenges and potential solutions of customer authentication.

The working paper examines the evolution of customer authentication methods from the early days of identifying someone visually to the present environment of using biometrics. The paper reviews each method regarding its process, advantages and disadvantages, and applicability to the payments environment.

Much of the paper looks at biometrics, an authentication method that has received increased attention over the last year—partly because smartphones keep getting smarter as folks keep adding new applications, and as manufacturers keep improving microphones, cameras, accelerometers, touch sensors, and more.

The table lays out six key characteristics that we can use to evaluate a biometric system for a particular application.

New_characteristics_table

The use of biometrics will be the subject of an upcoming forum hosted by the Retail Payments Research Forum later this fall, so stay tuned as we finalize the date and agenda. In the meantime, if you have any comments or questions about the working paper, please let us know.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

May 4, 2015 in authentication, biometrics, emerging payments, innovation, mobile banking, mobile payments, risk management | Permalink

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February 02, 2015


Does More Security Mean More Friction in Payments?

In a 2014 post, we discussed the issue of consumers' security practices in light of the regulatory liability protection provided to consumers, especially related to electronic transactions. Recognizing that poor security practices will continue, financial institutions, merchants, and solution vendors continue to implement additional security and fraud deterrence tools in the payment flow. Sometimes those tools can add complexity to a financial transaction.

One of the critical elements in a consumer's experience when performing a financial transaction is the concept of friction. In the payments environment, friction can be measured by the number and degree of barriers that impede a smooth and successful transaction flow. Potential causes of friction in a payment transaction include lack of acceptance, slow speed, inaccuracy, high cost, numerous steps, and lack of reliability. We usually think that to decrease friction is to increase convenience.

As the level of friction increases, consumers become more likely to rethink their purchase and payment decisions—an action that merchants and financial institutions alike dread because an abandoned payment transaction represents lost revenue. Individual consumers have their preferred payment methods, and their perspective of the convenience associated with a particular method is a key factor in their choice. For this reason, the payment industry stakeholders have been working diligently to reduce the level of friction in the various forms of payments. Technology provides a number of advantages, potentially reducing the overall friction of payments by providing consumers with a variety of payment form factors. For example, smartphones can support integrated payment applications allowing the consumer to easily call up their payment credentials and execute a payment transaction at a merchant's terminal. With abandonment rates as high as 68 percent, online merchants, working diligently to reduce friction, are streamlining their checkout process by reducing the number of screens to navigate.

Clearly cognizant of the friction issue, the industry has focused much of its efforts on operating fraud risk tools in the background, so that customers remain unaware of them. Other tools are more overt—biometrics on mobile phones, hardware tokens for PCs, and transaction alerts. But some security improvements the industry has undertaken have resulted in more friction, including the EMV card. A consumer must now leave the EMV card in the terminal for the duration of the transaction when previously all the consumer had to do was simply swipe the card. It will be interesting to see if and how consumers adjust their payment habits should they view the EMV card technology as high in friction. Will this motivate consumers to move away from card-based payments? Time will tell, and we will closely follow this issue.

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed


February 2, 2015 in biometrics, chip-and-pin, EMV, innovation, payments | Permalink

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David,
You've touched upon an important continuing battle. The balancing act of maximizing conversion vs. maximizing security/fraud prevention can be a real conundrum. It impacts revenue and can even divide offices. It comes down to what your product/service is, what your appetite for risk is, and what tools you have in place. It is important though for financial institutions and ecommerce companies to seek out new technology solutions to maximize security and not be stagnant with the status quo.

Posted by: Logan | February 03, 2015 at 07:46 PM

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December 22, 2014


Top 10 Payments Events in 2014

As the year draws to a close, the Portals and Rails team would like to share its own "Top 10" list of major payments-related events and issues that took place in the United States this year.

#10: Proposed prepaid rule. After a long wait, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued its proposed rules on general reloadable prepaid cards in November. While the major players in the prepaid card industry had already adopted most of the practices included in the proposed rule, the proposal allowing overdrafts and credit extensions is likely to generate differing perspectives during the comment period before a final rule is adopted in 2015.

#9: Regulation II. The U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia upheld the Federal Reserve Bank's rules regarding interchange fees and network routing rules, reversing a 2013 decision. Notice of appeal on the interchange fee portion of the ruling has been given, but resolution of the network routing rules has cleared the way for the development of applications supporting routing on chip cards.

#8: Payment trends. The detailed Federal Reserve Bank's triennial payments study results were released in July 2014, continuing the Fed's 15-year history of conducting this comprehensive payments research. Cash usage continued to decline but remained the most-used form of payment in terms of transaction volume.

#7: Card-not-present (CNP) fraud. With the growing issuance of chip cards and the experience of other countries post-EMV migration—with substantial amounts of fraud moving to the online commerce environment—the payments industry continues to search for improved security solutions for CNP fraud that minimize customer friction and abandonment.

#6: Faster payments. Continuing a process it began in the fall of 2013 at the release of a consultative white paper, the Federal Reserve Bank held town halls and stakeholder meetings throughout the year in preparation of the release of its proposed roadmap towards improving the payment system.

#5: Virtual currencies. Every conference we attended had sessions or tracks focused on virtual currencies like Bitcoin. While there was some advancement in the acceptance of Bitcoin by major retailers, the number of consumers using the currency did not rise significantly.

#4: Mobile payments. The entry of Apple with its powerful brand identity into the mobile payments arena with Apple Pay has energized the mobile payments industry and brought improved payment security through tokenization and biometrics closer to the mainstream. (Apple Pay's impact on mobile payment transaction volume will likely be negligible for a couple of years.) Additionally, the use of host card emulation, or HCE, as an alternative contactless communications technology provides another option for mobile wallet development.

#3: EMV migration. The frequency and magnitude of the data breaches this year have spurred financial institutions and merchants alike into speeding up their support of EMV chip cards in advance of the October 2015 liability shift.

#2: Third-party processors. Regulators and law enforcement escalated the attention they were giving to the relationships of financial institutions with third-party processors because of increased concerns about deceitful business practices as well as money laundering.

And…drum roll, please!

#1: Data breaches. The waves of data breaches that started in late 2013 continued to grow throughout 2014 as more and more retailers revealed that their transaction and customer data had been compromised. The size and frequency of the data breaches provided renewed impetus to improve the security of our payments system through chip card migration and the implementation of tokenization.

How does this list compare to your Top 10?

All of us at the Retail Payments Risk Forum wish our Portals and Rails readers Happy Holidays and a prosperous and fraud-free 2015!

Photo of Mary Kepler Photo of Doug King Photo of David Lott Photo of Julius Weyman



Mary Kepler, vice president; Doug King, payments risk specialist; Dave Lott, payments risk expert; and Julius Weyman, vice president—all of the Atlanta Fed's Retail Payments Risk Forum.


December 22, 2014 in chip-and-pin, cybercrime, data security, EMV, innovation, mobile payments, prepaid, regulations, third-party service provider | Permalink

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